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  1. Aristotle's Empiricism.Marc Gasser-Wingate - 2021 - Oxford University Press.
    Aristotle is famous for thinking that all our knowledge comes from perception. But it's not immediately clear what this view is meant to entail. It's not clear, for instance, what perception is supposed to contribute to the more advanced forms of knowledge that derive from it. Nor is it clear how we should understand the nature of its contribution—what it might mean to say that these more advanced forms of knowledge are "derived from" or "based on" what we perceive. Aristotle (...)
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  2. Uma investigação sobre o conceito de epagoge nos Analíticos de Aristóteles.Aislan Fernandes Pereira - 2020 - Dissertation, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, Brazil
  3. Conviction, Priority, and Rationalism in Aristotle's Epistemology.Marc Gasser-Wingate - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (1):1-27.
    In this paper I argue against rationalist readings of Aristotle's epistemology, on which our scientific understanding is justified on the basis of certain demonstrative first principles that are themselves justified only by some brute form of rational intuition. I then investigate the relationship between our intuition of principles and the broadly perceptual knowledge from which it derives. I argue that, for Aristotle, perceptual knowledge helps justify our intuition of principles, and also serves as an authority against which these principles and (...)
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  4. A Class-Room Introduction to Logic.Desh Raj Sirswal - 2020 - Pehowa(Kurukshetra): CPPIS.
    This book is an outcome of my wordpress page “A Class-Room Introduction to Logic” This was prepared for the students of the paper entitled “Principles of Logic” in the Diploma-in-Reasoning Course of Department of Philosophy, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra, where I taught in the Diploma about four years and presently have an experience of teaching logic about 15 years. This book is beneficial for graduate students who have elementary logic course in their syllabus as well as for the general reader of (...)
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  5. Aristotle on the Perception of Universals.Marc Gasser-Wingate - 2019 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 27 (3):446-467.
    Aristotle claims that "although we perceive particulars, perception is of universals; for instance of human being, not of Callias-the-human-being" (APo II.19 100a16-b1). I offer an interpretation of this claim and examine its significance in Aristotle's epistemology.
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  6. La objeción de Aristóteles a la teoría platónica de la reminiscencia.Alejandro Farieta - 2015 - Pensamiento y Cultura 18 (2):6-28.
    This paper provides an interpretation of Aristotle’s criticism to the solution to Meno’s Paradox suggested by Plato. According to Aristotle, when Plato says that reminiscence (anámnēsis) is achieved, what is actually achieved is induction (epagōgê). Our interpretation is based on two aspects: (1) semantic criticism, since Plato’s use of the term anámnēsis is unusual; and (2) the theory is not able to give an adequate explanation of the effective discovery.
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  7. Louis Groarke, An Aristotelian Account of Induction: Creating Something From Nothing[REVIEW]John P. McCaskey - 2010 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (4).
    Groarke is surely right that Aristotle believed the cognitive hierarchy he described in Posterior Analytics B 19 is central to, and not antithetical to, validating the syllogism described in Prior Analytics B 23. But did Aristotle really believe induction ultimately relies on what Groarke calls “a stroke or leap of understanding,” “immediate illumination,” “moment of immediate cognition,” “a direct insight,” “moment of illumination,” and so on? . . . Overall, what Groarke says here is provocative and inviting, even if not (...)
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  8. Freeing Aristotelian Epagōgē From “Prior Analytics” II 23.John P. McCaskey - 2007 - Apeiron 40 (4):345-374.
    Since at least late antiquity, Aristotle’s Prior Analytics B 23 has been misread. Aristotle does not think that an induction is a syllogism made good by complete enumeration. The confusion can be eliminated by considering the nature of the surviving text and watching very closely Aristotle’s moving back and forth between “induction” and “syllogism from induction.” Though he does move freely between them, the two are not synonyms.
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  9. The Science of Conjecture: Evidence and Probability Before Pascal.James Franklin - 2001 - Baltimore, USA: Johns Hopkins University Press.
    How were reliable predictions made before Pascal and Fermat's discovery of the mathematics of probability in 1654? What methods in law, science, commerce, philosophy, and logic helped us to get at the truth in cases where certainty was not attainable? The book examines how judges, witch inquisitors, and juries evaluated evidence; how scientists weighed reasons for and against scientific theories; and how merchants counted shipwrecks to determine insurance rates. Also included are the problem of induction before Hume, design arguments for (...)
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  10. Induction and Necessity in the Philosophy of Aristotle.Gerd Buchdahl - 1963 - London: Aquin Press.