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  1. Plato and Aristotle on The Unhypothetical.Dominic Bailey - 2006 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 30:101-126.
  2. Immediacy in Aristotle’s Epistemology.Breno Zuppolini - 2021 - Phronesis: A Journal for Ancient Philosophy 66 (2):111–138.
    This article discusses immediate premises in Aristotle’s epistemology. The traditional interpretation identifies immediacy with indemonstrability: immediate truths are the indemonstrable principles of science from which the theorems are derived by demonstration. Against this common reading, I argue that Aristotle’s recognition of two kinds of epistemic priority (priority by nature and priority to us) commits him to the existence of two types of immediacy, only one of which is equivalent to indemonstrability. As a result, my interpretation offers a better understanding of (...)
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  3. Aristotle on Geometrical Potentialities.Naoya Iwata - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (3):371-397.
  4. Immediacy in Aristotle’s Epistemology.Breno Zuppolini - 2021 - Phronesis 66 (2):111-138.
    This article discusses immediate premises in Aristotle’s epistemology. The traditional interpretation identifies immediacy with indemonstrability: immediate truths are the indemonstrable principles of science from which the theorems are derived by demonstration. Against this common reading, I argue that Aristotle’s recognition of two kinds of epistemic priority commits him to the existence of two types of immediacy, only one of which is equivalent to indemonstrability. As a result, my interpretation offers a better understanding of a puzzling passage that seems to contradict (...)
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  5. Aristotle’s Criticism of Pre-Socratic Natural Philosophy.Abduljaleel Alwali - 2006 - Amman, Jordan: Dar Al-Warraq.
    Aristotle (384-322 B.C), a well know Greek philosopher, physician, scientist and politician. A variety of identifying researches have been written on him. It is therefore a considerable pride for the researcher to write something about him when even mentioning his name and his father's name is a point of prestige in the Greek Language. His name means the preferable sublimity whereas Nicomachus (his father's name) means the definable negotiator. His father's and mother's origin belongs to Asclepiade, the favorite origin in (...)
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  6. A Basic Conflict in Aristotle's Philosophy.George Boas - 1943 - American Journal of Philology 64 (2):172.
  7. Review of: R. Polansky & W. Wians (eds.), Reading Aristotle. Argument and Exposition. [REVIEW]Florian Marion - 2019 - Revue Philosophique De Louvain 117:166-169.
    Review of: R. Polansky & W. Wians (eds.), Reading Aristotle. Argument and Exposition, Leiden/Boston, Brill, 2017, in Revue philosophique de Louvain, 117, p. 166-169.
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  8. Aristotle’s Akrasia: The Role of Potential Knowledge and Practical Syllogism.Imge Oranli - 2018 - Proceedings of the XXIII World Congress of Philosophy 2 (2):233-238.
    In Nicomachean Ethics VII Aristotle describes akrasia as a disposition. Taking into account that it is a disposition, I argue that akrasia cannot be understood on an epistemological basis alone, i.e., it is not merely a problem of knowledge that the akratic person acts the ways he does, but rather one is akratic due to a certain kind of habituation, where the person is not able to activate the potential knowledge s/he possesses. To stress this point, I focus on the (...)
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  9. Aristotle’s Empiricist Theory of Doxastic Knowledge.Hendrik Lorenz & Benjamin Morison - 2019 - Phronesis 64 (4):431-464.
    Aristotle takes practical wisdom and arts or crafts to be forms of knowledge which, we argue, can usefully be thought of as ‘empiricist’. This empiricism has two key features: knowledge does not rest on grasping unobservable natures or essences; and knowledge does not rest on grasping logical relations that hold among propositions. Instead, knowledge rests on observation, memory, experience and everyday uses of reason. While Aristotle’s conception of theoretical knowledge does require grasping unobservable essences and logical relations that hold among (...)
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  10. Reason in Action in Aristotle: A Reading of EE V.12/NE VI.12.Juan S. Piñeros Glasscock - 2019 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 57 (3):391-417.
    I present a reading of EE 5.12/NE 6.12 according to which Aristotle argues for an executive account of φρόνησις (practical wisdom) to show why it is useful to possess this virtue. On this account, the practically wise person's actions are expressive of his knowledge of the fine, a knowledge that only the practically wise person has. This is why he must not only be a good deliberator, but also cunning (δεινότης), able to execute his actions well. An important consequence of (...)
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  11. Reason in Action in Aristotle: A Reading of EE V.12/EN VI.12.Juan S. Piñeros Glasscock - 2019 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 57 (3):391-417.
    aristotle closes the second common book of his ethical treatises by considering a number of puzzles about wisdom and φρόνησις,1 devoting the bulk of his attention to a puzzle about the usefulness of the latter. Briefly, the puzzle is that if φρόνησις is useful insofar as it enables us to act virtuously, it will be useless both to the virtuous person, who naturally acts well without possessing it, and to the non-virtuous person, so long as someone else tells her how (...)
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  12. NECESSITY IN ARISTOTLE. Delcomminette Aristote Et la Nécessité. Pp. 645. Paris: Librairie Philosophique J. Vrin, 2018. Paper, €45. ISBN: 978-2-7116-2736-3. [REVIEW]Paolo Fait - forthcoming - The Classical Review:1-3.
  13. Coming-to-Know as a Way of Coming-to-Be: Aristotle’s De Anima III.5.Michael Baur - 2011 - In Michael Baur & Robert Wood (eds.), Person, Being, and History: Essays in Honor of Kenneth L. Schmitz. Washington, DC, USA: pp. 77-102.
    This chapter argues that it is possible to identify, in the coming to be of knowledge, the three elements that Aristotle says are involved in any kind of coming to be whatsoever (viz., matter, form, and the generated composite object). Specifically, it is argued that in this schema the passive intellect (pathetikos nous) corresponds to the matter, the active intellect (poetikos nous) corresponds to the form, and the composite object corresponds to the mind as actually knowing.
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  14. Aristotle on Scientific Knowledge - R. D. McKirihan: Principles and Proofs: Aristotle's Theory of Demonstrative Science. Pp. Xiv + 340. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1992. Cased, £35. [REVIEW]J. D. G. Evans - 1994 - The Classical Review 44 (1):84-85.
  15. The Posterior Analytics - Lesher From Inquiry to Demonstrative Knowledge. New Essays on Aristotle's Posterior Analytics. Pp. Xii + 211. Kelowna, BC, Canada: Academic Printing & Publishing, 2010. Paper, Cdn$28.95 . ISBN: 978-1-926598-01-7. [REVIEW]Paolo Biondi - 2012 - The Classical Review 62 (1):76-78.
  16. Phronesis and Automated Science: The Case of Machine Learning and Biology.Emanuele Ratti - 2019 - In Fabio Sterpetti & M. Bertolaso (eds.), Will Science Remain Human? Springer.
    The applications of machine learning and deep learning to the natural sciences has fostered the idea that the automated nature of algorithmic analysis will gradually dispense human beings from scientific work. In this paper, I will show that this view is problematic, at least when ML is applied to biology. In particular, I will claim that ML is not independent of human beings and cannot form the basis of automated science. Computer scientists conceive their work as being a case of (...)
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  17. Aristotle and the Epistemology of Nishida Kitarō.Z. Agustin Jacinto - 2009 - In Raquel Bouso & James W. Heisig (eds.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy 6: Confluences and Cross-Currents. Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 80-€“108.
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  18. Hippocrates G. Apostle, "Aristotle's Posterior Analytics". [REVIEW]Robin Smith - 1983 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 21 (3):395.
  19. Aristotle: Ways of Truth and Ways of Opinion.Kurt Pritzl - 1993 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 67:241.
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  20. Theories of Intuition in Plato and Aristotle. [REVIEW]Norman Gulley - 1963 - The Classical Review 13 (3):285-287.
  21. Aristotle on the Common Sense: A Reply to Kahn and Others.Irving L. Block - 1988 - Ancient Philosophy 8 (2):235-249.
  22. Aristotle on Scientific Knowledge. [REVIEW]J. D. G. Evans - 1994 - The Chesterton Review 44 (1):84-85.
  23. Aristotle’s Concept of Intellect (Νοῦσ) in the Context of His Main Philosophical Writings. [REVIEW]Henry Walter Brann - 1972 - Philosophy and History 5 (2):157-160.
  24. Plato and Aristotle on Experience and Expertise: The Case of Medicine.Chloe Balla - 2003 - Philosophical Inquiry 25 (3/4):177-188.
  25. Aristotle on Mind and the Senses.G. E. R. Lloyd & G. E. L. Owen (eds.) - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
    The Symposia Aristotelica were inaugurated at Oxford in 1957. They are conferences of select groups of Aristotelian scholars from the UK, USA and Europe, and are held every three years. In 1975 the meeting was held in Cambridge and was devoted to Aristotle's psychological treatises, the De anima and the Parva uaturalia. The members of the conference discussed some of the much debated problems of Aristotle's psychology and broached important new topics such as his ideas on imagination. Dr Lloyd and (...)
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  26. Aristotle on Perceptual Truth and Falsity.Aaron Ben-Zeev - 1984 - Apeiron 18 (2):118 - 125.
  27. Connecting Information with Scientific Method: Darwin’s Significance for Epistemology.Matthias Kuhle & Sabine Kuhle - 2010 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 41 (2):333-357.
    Theories of epistemology make reference—via the perspective of an observer—to the structure of information transfer, which generates reality, of which the observer himself forms a part. It can be shown that any epistemological approach which implies the participation of tautological structural elements in the information transfer necessarily leads to an antinomy. Nevertheless, since the time of Aristotle the paradigm of mathematics—and thus tautological structure—has always been a hidden ingredient in the various concepts of knowledge acquisition or general theories of information (...)
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  28. The Question of Apriorism.Barry Smith - 1990 - Austrian Economics Newsletter (1/2):1-5.
    We defend a view according to which Austrian economics rests on what can most properly be called an Aristotelian methodology. This implies a realist perspective, according to which the world exists independently of our thinking and reasoning activities; an essentialist perspective, according to which the world contains certain simple essences or natures which may come together in law-like ways to form more complex static and dynamic wholes, and an apriorist perspective, according to which given essences and essential structures are intelligible, (...)
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  29. T.K. Johansen, Aristotle On The Sense-Organs. [REVIEW]Victor Caston - 2001 - Philosophy in Review 21:127-129.
  30. Aristotle's Answer to the Question "What is Knowledge?".Thomas Kiefer - 2003 - Dissertation, The University of Nebraska - Lincoln
    My dissertation challenges much of the last 1700 years of interpretation on important parts of Aristotle's philosophy. In this work I examine in depth each of the four viable answers Aristotle provides to the question "what is knowledge?" I begin with the answer that "knowledge is an 'apodeictic hexis'" . An understanding of this statement requires a prior consideration of many aspects of Aristotle's ontology and psychology, as well as epistemology. This consideration provides not only an analysis of this answer, (...)
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  31. Knowledge and Demonstration: Aristotle’s Posterior Analytics. [REVIEW]Jonathan Barnes - 2006 - Isis 97:195-196.
  32. The Role of Phantasia in Aristotle’s Ethics.I. Patsioti-Tsacpounidis - 2006 - Skepsis: A Journal for Philosophy and Interdisciplinary Research 17 (1-2).
  33. Exposition of the Posterior Analytics of Aristotle. [REVIEW]L. C. - 1957 - Review of Metaphysics 10 (4):714-715.
    This translation of Thomas' paraphrase and analysis of Aristotle's philosophy of science is, unfortunately, mimeographed and bound in a paper cover. It lacks the introductory material which is needed to orient the reader philosophically and to specify the issues at stake; it also lacks notes giving the meanings of technical terms and comparing the exposition to Aristotle's own text. There is, however, a rather extensive index. The publication of this volume intensifies the historical problem whether commentaries such as this accurately (...)
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  34. Aristotle on Phantasia.Alfredo Ferrarin - 2006 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 21:89-123.
  35. Aristotle on the Meaning of Science.H. S. Thayer - 1979 - Philosophical Inquiry 1 (2):87-104.
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  36. Aristotle On Knowing First Principles.D. Modrak - 1981 - Philosophical Inquiry 3 (2):63-83.
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  37. Aristotle on Perception.D. Andriopoulos - 1993 - Philosophical Inquiry 15 (3-4):85-98.
  38. Colloquium 7: In Defense of Inner Sense: Aristotle on Perceiving That One Sees.Thomas Johansen - 2006 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 21 (1):235-285.
  39. Plato on "Phantasia".Allan Silverman - 1991 - Classical Antiquity 10 (1):123-147.
  40. Review. Syncrisis Politeion, Phantasia Politeias Isonomou Ioannes G. Taifacos.J. G. F. Powell - 2001 - The Classical Review 51 (1):106-107.
  41. TK Johansen, Aristotle on the Sense-Organs Reviewed By.Victor Caston - 2001 - Philosophy in Review 21 (2):127-129.
  42. Phantasia in the Philosophy of Aristotle.M. D. Philippe - 1971 - The Thomist 35 (1):1-42.
  43. Phantasia Kataleptike.Francis Henry Sandbach - 1971 - In A. A. Long (ed.), Problems in Stoicism. Athlone Press.
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  44. Aristotle's Treatment of Phantasia.D. A. Rees - 1971 - In John Peter Anton, George L. Kustas & Anthony Preus (eds.), Essays in Ancient Greek Philosophy. State University of New York Press. pp. 491--504.
  45. Aquinas on Phantasia.Dorothea Frede - 2001 - In Dominik Perler (ed.), Ancient and Medieval Theories of Intentionality. Brill. pp. 155--83.
  46. Aristotle on Practical Truth: Coherence Vs. Correspondence?Andreas Graeser - 2004 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 9 (1):191-200.
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  47. Plato and Aristotle on the Unhypothetical.D. T. J. Bailey - 2006 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 30:101.
  48. Pavel Gregorić, Aristotle on the Common Sense.Hendrik Lorenz - 2009 - Rhizai. A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science:225-231.
  49. Nous and Two Kinds of Epistêmê in Aristotle’s Posterior Analytics.Zeev Perelmuter - 2010 - Phronesis 55 (3):228-254.
    At the beginning of Posterior Analytics 2.19 Aristotle reminds us that we cannot claim demonstrative knowledge unless we know immediate premisses, the archai of demonstrations. By the end of the chapter he explains why the cognitive state whereby we get to know archai must be Nous. In between, however, Aristotle describes the process of the acquisition of concepts, not immediate premisses. How should we understand this? There is a general agreement that it is Nous by means of which we acquire (...)
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  50. Pengaruh Gaya Kepemimpinan Terhadap Kepuasan Kerja (Studi Pada Perawat di Rumah Sakit X di Jakarta).Friska Stefanie - 2010 - Phronesis (Misc) 6 (12).
    Nurses’ job satisfaction is the most important thing in health care business science the attitudes and the behaviors of the nurses could affects the health care services quality. The objectives of this study is to find out whether there are direct or indirect effects from the perception of transactional leadership, perception of transformational leadership, perception of distributive justice, perception of procedural justice, to job satisfaction. The samples of this study consist of 132 nurses from X hospital. The measurement instruments which (...)
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