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  1. Albertus Magnus and Thomas Aquinas on What is “Better-Known” in Natural Science.John H. Boyer & Daniel C. Wagner - 2019 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 93:199-225.
    Aristotelian commenters have long noted an apparent contradiction between what Aristotle says in Posterior Analytics I.2 and Physics I.1 about how we obtain first principles of a science. At Posterior 71b35–72a6, Aristotle states that what is most universal (καθόλου) is better-known by nature and initially less-known to us, while the particular (καθ’ ἕκαστον) is initially better-known to us, but less-known by nature. At Physics 184a21-30, however, Aristotle states that we move from what is better-known to us, which is universal (καθόλου), (...)
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  2. Hegel and Aquinas on Self-Knowledge and Historicity.Michael Baur - 1994 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 68:125.
    The Hegelian and the Thomistic accounts of self-knowledge are solidly Aristotelian in their origins and motivations. In their conclusions and consequences, however, the two accounts exhibit significant differences. Hegel argues that genuine self-knowledge is necessarily social and historical, while Aquinas says nothing about history or society in his account of self-knowledge. The aim of this paper is not to decide the issue concerning historicity in favor of either Hegel or Aquinas. The aim here is rather to address a prior question: (...)
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