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  1. Vitalism and panpsychism in the philosophy of Anne Conway.Olivia Branscum - forthcoming - British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-22.
    Anne Conway (1631–1679) is often described as a vitalist. Scholars typically take this to mean that Conway considers life to be ubiquitous throughout the world. While Conway is indeed a vitalist in this sense, I argue that she is also committed to a stronger view: namely, the panpsychist view that mental capacities are ubiquitous and fundamental in creation. Reading Conway as a panpsychist highlights several aspects of her philosophy that deserve further attention, especially her accounts of emanative causation and universal (...)
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  2. Anne Conway's Ontology of Creation: A Pluralist Interpretation.John Grey - forthcoming - Journal of the American Philosophical Association:1-16.
    Does Anne Conway (1631–79) hold that the created world consists of a single underlying substance? Some have argued that she does; others have argued that she is a priority monist and so holds that there are many created substances, but the whole created world is ontologically prior to each particular creature. Against both of these proposals, this article makes the case for a substance pluralist interpretation of Conway: individual creatures are distinct substances, and the whole created world is not ontologically (...)
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  3. Rethinking Early Modern Philosophy.Graham Clay & Ruth Boeker - 2023 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 31 (2):105-114.
    This introductory article outlines how this special issue contributes to existing scholarship that calls for a rethinking and re-evaluation of common assumptions about early modern philosophy. One way of challenging existing narratives is by questioning what role systems or systematicity play during this period. Another way of rethinking early modern philosophy is by considering assumptions about the role of philosophy itself and how philosophy can effect change in those who form philosophical beliefs or engage in philosophical argumentation. A further way (...)
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  4. The Metaphysics of Margaret Cavendish and Anne Conway: Monism, Vitalism, and Self-Motion.Marcy P. Lascano - 2023 - New York, US: OUP Usa.
    This book is an examination of the metaphysical systems of Margaret Cavendish and Anne Conway, who share many superficial similarities. By providing a detailed analysis of their views on substance, monism, self-motion, individuation, and identity over time, as well as causation, perception, and freedom, it demonstrates the interesting ways in which their accounts differ. Seeing their systems in tandem highlights the originality of each philosopher. In addition to providing the details of their metaphysical views, the book also shows how they (...)
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  5. Reconciling Moral Responsibility with Multiplicity in Conway’s Principles.Hope Sample - 2023 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 31 (2):179-191.
    Anne Conway’s commitment to the moral responsibility of creatures, or created beings, is seemingly in tension with her unique metaphysics. Conway is committed to individual moral responsibility. Conway insists that an innocent person ought not be punished for someone else’s sin. Interesting recent work highlights a unique aspect of Conway’s position that creatures are multiplicities: not only are creatures integrated into the larger whole of creation, but also their parts are mutually integrated into one another. The latter, which I will (...)
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  6. Anne Conway on Divine and Creaturely Freedom.Hope Sample - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 31 (6):1151-1167.
    Conway characterizes freedom in apparently contradictory ways. She describes God as the most free, yet he is necessitated to act perfectly due to his wisdom and goodness. Created beings, by contrast, sin. They are not necessitated to do so. This suggests that Conway has a binary account of freedom: divine freedom is a matter of being necessitated by wisdom and goodness, whereas creaturely freedom consists in indifference, understood as a power to act, or not act. Despite the apparently conflicting remarks, (...)
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  7. Margaret Cavendish, Anne Conway, and Catharine Cockburn on Matter.Emily Thomas - 2023 - In Karen Detlefsen & Lisa Shapiro (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Women and Early Modern European Philosophy. New York and Abingdon: Routledge. pp. 112–126.
  8. Suffering for Justice in Anne Conway and Maria W. Stewart.Timothy Yenter - 2023 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 61 (1):275-294.
    Anne Conway and Maria W. Stewart are quietly revolutionary philosophers who provide valuable insights into the nature of suffering and its relation to justice. Conway scholars have claimed that she offers a theodicy, trying to reconcile suffering with the existence of a just God. However, this does not make sense of her arguments or audience. Instead, we should see her as a theoretician of the role of suffering in a person's life. Moving beyond the personal, Stewart's emphasis on social sources (...)
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  9. Anne Conway's Atemporal Account of Agency.Hope Sample - 2022 - Ergo 9:47-69.
    This paper aims to resolve an unremarked-upon tension between Anne Conway’s commitment to the moral responsibility of created beings, or creatures, and her commitment to emanative, constant creation. Emanation causation has an atemporal aspect according to which God’s act of will coexists with its effect. There is no before or after, or past or future in God’s causal contribution. Additionally, Conway’s constant creation picture has it that all times are determined via divine emanation. Creaturely agency, by contrast, is fundamentally temporal, (...)
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  10. “El Caballo Será Por Fin Alguna Vez Convertible En Hombre”: Consideraciones En Torno Al Caballo y Su Transmutación En Anne Conway.Natalia Soledad Strok - 2022 - Siglo Dieciocho 3:59-80.
    In Principia philosophiae antiquissimae et recentissimae (1690) Anne Conway (1631-1679) develops her monistic metaphysics regarding creation, whose distinctive characteristic is transmutations for the individuals that compose it. In chapter VI of this posthumous work, Conway exemplifies this process of transmutation with the case of a horse, which changes, after death, into a human being. In this article I intend to analyze this example to show that it is not casual that the horse in question rises in the hierarchy of beings. (...)
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  11. Christian Platonism in Early Modernity.Derek A. Michaud Derek A. Michaud - 2021 - In Alexander J. B. Hampton & John Peter Kenney (eds.), Christian Platonism: A History. Cambridge University Press. pp. 280-302.
  12. Anne Conway.Timothy Yenter - 2021 - In Stewart Goetz & Charles Talieferro (eds.), The Encyclopedia of Philosophy of Religion.
    Anne Conway (1631–1679) was one of the most intellectually adventurous and well-read philosophers of religion in the seventeenth century. Her unfinished systematic treatise, posthumously published as The Principles of the Most Ancient and Modern Philosophy, moves from the divine attributes through a theodicy based on universal salvation to a rejection of substance dualism. Her approach demonstrates a syncretist approach to religion that blends multiple intellectual traditions, including Cambridge Platonism, Quakerism, and the Kabbalah. Her admirers included Henry More, Francis von Helmont, (...)
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  13. A Panpsychist Interpretation of Anne Conway's Metaphysics.Andrew Fyffe - 2020 - Aporia 20:1-9.
    This paper proposes a panpsychist interpretation of Anne Conway’s (1631-1679) metaphysics, as elucidated in 'The Principles of the Most Ancient and Modern Philosophy.' Contemporary versions of panpsychism attempt to explain how consciousness is realised in the natural world. They posit that matter is intrinsically experiential, such that when it is arranged into the form of a human brain, it gives rise to human consciousness. Similarly, Conway argues that substance is constituted by both Body and Spirit. The former serves as an (...)
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  14. Species and the Good in Anne Conway's Metaethics.John R. T. Grey - 2020 - In Colin Marshall (ed.), Comparative Metaethics: Neglected Perspectives on the Foundations of Morality. New York: Routledge. pp. 102-118.
    Anne Conway rejects the view that creatures are essentially members of any natural kind more specific than the kind 'creature'. That is, she rejects essentialism about species membership. This chapter provides an analysis of one of Anne Conway's arguments against such essentialism, which (as I argue) is drawn from metaethical rather than metaphysical premises. In her view, if a creature's species or kind were inscribed in its essence, that essence would constitute a limit on the creature's potential to participate in (...)
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  15. New Perspectives on Agency in Early Modern Philosophy.Ruth Boeker - 2019 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 27 (5):625-630.
    This introductory article outlines the themes and aims of this special issue, which offers new perspectives on early modern debates about agency in two ways: First, it recovers writings on agency and liberty that have been widely neglected or that have received insufficient attention, including writings by Anne Conway, Henry More, Ralph Cudworth, William King, Gabrielle Suchon, Elizabeth Berkeley Burnet, Mary Astell, and Anthony Ashley Cooper, the Third Earl of Shaftesbury. Second, it reveals the richness of early modern debates about (...)
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  16. Loving the Body, Loving the Soul: Conway’s Vitalist Critique of Cartesian and Morean Dualism.Julia Borcherding - 2019 - Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 9.
    In this paper, I examine Anne Conway’s ‘argument from love’ in her Principles of the Most Ancient and Modern Philosophy. This argument, supported by a further argument, the ‘argument from pain’, undermines the dualist dichotomy between mind and matter by appealing to a vitalist similarity principle. My goal is two-fold: first, to contribute to a close systematic reconstruction and analysis of Conway’s arguments, which so far is largely lacking in the literature; second, to show that these arguments are richer and (...)
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  17. Anne Conway’s Metaphysics of Sympathy.Christia Mercer - 2019 - In Eileen O’Neill & Marcy P. Lascano (eds.), Feminist History of Philosophy: The Recovery and Evaluation of Women’s Philosophical Thought. Springer. pp. 49-73.
    The main goal of this chapter is to present the basic components of Anne Conway’s metaphysics of sympathy. To that end, I will explicate her concepts of God or first substance and second substance or Christ with special emphasis on the key role that the second substance plays in her philosophy. I argue that one of the keys to Conway’s system lies in her reinterpretation of the Christian narrative about suffering. She combines Christian imagery with ancient and modern ideas in (...)
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  18. Anne Conway's response to Cartesianism.Christia Mercer - 2019 - In Steven Nadler, Tad M. Schmaltz & Delphine Antoine-Mahut (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Descartes and Cartesianism. Oxford University Press.
  19. Seniausios ir naujausios filosofijos pradai.Anne Conway & Laurynas Adomaitis (eds.) - 2018 - Vilnius: Jonas ir Jokūbas.
    Anne Conway is an English philosopher (1631-1679) whose only work, The Principles of the Most Ancient and Modern Philosophy, was published posthumously in 1690. Although her philosophy is a highly original response to the period's main philosophical problems and although her contemporaries offered the work high praise, Conway was left out of the history of philosophy by later thinkers, like so many other significant early modern women. Her treatise is a highly original philosophical work that contains her wide ranging and (...)
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  20. Harmony in Spinoza and His Critics.Timothy Yenter - 2018 - In Beth Lord (ed.), Spinoza’s Philosophy of Ratio. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. pp. 46-60.
    Spinoza is in a potentially untenable position. On the one hand, he argues that those who claim to see harmony in the universe are badly mistaken; they are falsely imagining rather than properly reasoning. On the other hand, harmony is positively discussed in his ethical writings and even serves as the basis for his vision of society. How can both be maintained? In this chapter l argue that this prima facie conflict between the two treatments of harmony is resolvable, but (...)
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  21. Conway’s Ontological Objection to Cartesian Dualism.John R. T. Grey - 2017 - Philosophers' Imprint 17:1-19.
    Anne Conway disagrees with substance dualism, the thesis that minds and bodies differ in nature or essence. Instead, she holds that “the distinction between spirit and body is only modal and incremental, not essential and substantial”. Yet several of her arguments against dualism have little force against the Cartesian, since they rely on premises no Cartesian would accept. In this paper, I show that Conway does have at least one powerful objection to substance dualism, drawn from premises that Descartes seems (...)
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  22. Anne Conway on Liberty.Marcy Lascano - 2017 - In Jacqueline Broad & Karen Detlefsen (eds.), Women and Liberty, 1600-1800: Philosophical Essays. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. pp. 60-87.
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  23. Anne Conway: Bodies in the Spiritual World.Marcy P. Lascano - 2013 - Philosophy Compass 8 (4):327-336.
    Anne Conway argues that all substances are spiritual. Yet, she also claims that all created substance has some type of body. Peter Loptson has argued that Conway didn’t carefully consider her view that all created beings have bodies for it seems God could have created only disembodied spirits. There are several reasons to think Loptson is right. First, Conway holds that God is all‐good and will do the best for his creation. She also holds that spirit is better than body. (...)
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  24. Platonism in Early Modern Natural Philosophy: The Case of Leibniz and Conway.Christia Mercer - 2012 - In Christoph Horn James Wilberding (ed.), Neoplatonic Natural Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
  25. Knowledge and Suffering in Early Modern Philosophy: G.W. Leibniz and Anne Conway.Christia Mercer - 2012 - In Sabrina Ebbersmeyer (ed.), Emotional Minds. De Gruyter. pp. 179.
  26. Lady Anne Conway.Sarah Hutton - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  27. A philosopher and her headaches: The tribulations of Anne Conway.Robert Martensen - 2008 - Philosophical Forum 39 (3):315-326.
  28. Women Philosophers of the Seventeenth Century, and: Anne Conway: A Woman Philosopher (review).Jane Duran - 2007 - Philosophy and Literature 31 (1):200-204.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Reviewed by:Women Philosophers of the Seventeenth Century, and: Anne Conway: A Woman PhilosopherJane DuranWomen Philosophers of the Seventeenth Century, by Jacqueline Broad; 204 pp. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002. $65.00. Anne Conway: A Woman Philosopher, by Sarah Hutton; 280 pp. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004. $75.00.Recent work on women philosophers has, in general, approached the topic from two vantage points: on the one hand, a number of anthologies have (...)
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  29. Eight women philosophers: theory, politics, and feminism.Jane Duran - 2006 - Urbana: University of Illinois Press.
    Overviews -- Hildegard of Bingen -- Anne Conway -- Mary Astell -- Mary Wollstonecraft -- Harriet Taylor Mill -- Edith Stein -- Simone Weil -- Simone de Beauvoir -- Conclusions.
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  30. Anne Conway: A Woman Philosopher (review).Eileen O'Neill - 2006 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (1):122-124.
    Eileen O'Neill - Anne Conway: A Woman Philosopher - Journal of the History of Philosophy 44:1 Journal of the History of Philosophy 44.1 122-124 Sarah Hutton. Anne Conway: A Woman Philosopher. Cambridge-New York: Cambridge University Press, 2004. Pp. viii + 271. Cloth, $75.00. In 1690 a Latin translation of a philosophical treatise, originally written in English by Anne Conway , was published anonymously. The English manuscript did not survive, but in 1692 the Latin version of Conway's text was translated into (...)
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  31. Anne Conway: A Woman PhilosopherSarah Hutton New York: Cambridge University Press, 2004, viii + 271 pp., $75.00. [REVIEW]Patricia Sheridan - 2006 - Dialogue 45 (4):810-813.
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  32. Anne Conway: A Woman Philosopher Sarah Hutton New York: Cambridge University Press, 2004, viii + 271 pp., $75.00. [REVIEW]Patricia Sheridan - 2006 - Dialogue 45 (4):810.
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  33. Anne Conway. [REVIEW]Catherine Brown Tkacz - 2006 - Review of Metaphysics 59 (3):645-646.
    In an age when women were not formally admitted to Cambridge, Conway was tutored by mail by Henry More, who had also taught her half-brother John Finch. Her notebooks, now lost, were published post-humously in 1690 in Latin translation by men who respected her and who with self-effacement introduced her work without mentioning their own names. Conway proposed replacing the doctrine of the Trinity with a metaphysical metaphor in which God is the Creator, Christ is mediating “Middle Nature,” and the (...)
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  34. Review of Sarah Hutton, Anne Conway: A Woman Philosopher[REVIEW]Karen Detlefsen - 2005 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (7).
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  35. Anne Conway: A Woman Philosopher.Sarah Hutton - 2004 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    This 2004 book was the first intellectual biography of one of the very first English women philosophers. At a time when very few women received more than basic education, Lady Anne Conway wrote an original treatise of philosophy, her Principles of the Most Ancient and Modern Philosophy, which challenged the major philosophers of her day - Descartes, Hobbes and Spinoza. Sarah Hutton's study places Anne Conway in her historical and philosophical context, by reconstructing her social and intellectual milieu. She traces (...)
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  36. Women Philosophers of the Seventeenth Century.Jacqueline Broad - 2002 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    In this rich and detailed study of early modern women's thought, Jacqueline Broad explores the complexity of women's responses to Cartesian philosophy and its intellectual legacy in England and Europe. She examines the work of thinkers such as Mary Astell, Elisabeth of Bohemia, Margaret Cavendish, Anne Conway and Damaris Masham, who were active participants in the intellectual life of their time and were also the respected colleagues of philosophers such as Descartes, Leibniz and Locke. She also illuminates the continuities between (...)
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  37. Anne Conway (1631-1679). Poglądy filozoficzne.Joanna Usakiewicz - 2002 - Idea Studia nad strukturą i rozwojem pojęć filozoficznych 14 (14).
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  38. Anne Conway (1631-1679). Rys biografczny.Joanna Usakiewicz - 2001 - Idea Studia nad strukturą i rozwojem pojęć filozoficznych 13 (13).
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  39. The Duchess and Viscountess: Negotiations between Mechanism and Vitalism in the Natural Philosophies of Margaret Cavendish and Anne Conway.Stephen Clucas - 2000 - In-Between: Essays and Studies in Literary Criticism 9:125-136.
  40. Anne Conway’s Vitalism and Her Critique of Descartes.Jennifer McRobert - 2000 - International Philosophical Quarterly 40 (1):21-35.
  41. Back to the texts.Stuart Brown - 1998 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 6 (2):269 – 273.
    Cambridge Texts in the History of Philosophy: Series Editors, Karl Ameriks and Desmond M. Clarke. Ren Descartes, Meditations on First Philosophy with Selections from the Objections and Replies . Translated and edited by John Cottingham. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1996. Pp. xlvi + 120. 25., 7.95 pb. ISBN 0-521-55252-4 (hb.). ISBN 0-521-55818-2 (pb.). Ralph Cudworth, A Treatise Concerning Eternal and Immutable Morality with A Treatise of Freewill . Edited by Sarah Hutton. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1996. Pp. xxxvi + 218. (...)
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  42. Conway, Anne, critic of more, Henry-spirit and matter.S. Hutton - 1995 - Archives de Philosophie 58 (3):371-384.
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  43. Anne Conway, Henry More and their World.Peter Loptson - 1995 - Dialogue 34 (1):139.
    Marjorie Hope Nicolson's The Conway Letters is, simultaneously, a work of so many different kinds, and offers itself to so many distinct cultural and intellectual constituencies, that it is difficult to include them all, and impossible to assign them priority or precedence. It is first of all, though, a delightful and important book. It has been out of print for a great many years, the original edition of 1930 long ago sold out. So its reappearance in a new edition, with (...)
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  44. Anne Conway.Anna-Karin Malmström - 1994 - Norsk Filosofisk Tidsskrift 2.
  45. Marjorie Hope Nicolson , The Conway Letters: The Correspondence of Anne, Viscountess Conway, Henry More, and their Friends, 1642–1684. Revised Edition with an Introduction and New Material Edited by Sarah Hutton. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1992. Pp. xxix + 592. ISBN 0-19-824876-8. £55.00. [REVIEW]John Henry - 1993 - British Journal for the History of Science 26 (3):357-358.
  46. The Conway Letters: The Correspondence of Anne, Viscountess Conway, Henry More, and Their Friends, 1642-1684.Marjorie Hope Nicolson (ed.) - 1992 - Clarendon Press.
    A scholarly edition of letters by Anne, Viscountess Conway, Henry More, and their friends. The edition presents an authoritative text, together with an introduction, commentary notes, and scholarly apparatus.
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  47. Anne Viscountess Conway: A Seventeenth Century Rationalist.Jane Duran - 1989 - Hypatia 4 (1):64 - 79.
    The work of Spinoza, Descartes and Leibniz is cited in an attempt to develop, both expositorily and critically, the philosophy of Anne Viscountess Conway. Broadly, it is contended that Conway's metaphysics, epistemology and account of the passions not only bear intriguing comparison with the work of the other well-known rationalists, but supersede them in some ways, particularly insofar as the notions of substance and ontological hierarchy are concerned. Citing the commentary of Loptson and Carolyn Merchant, and alluding to other commentary (...)
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  48. The Principles of the Most Ancient and Modern PhilosophyAnne Conway Edited and with an Introduction by Peter Loptson International Archives of the History of Ideas, vol. 101The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, 1982. Pp. 252. [REVIEW]E. J. Ashworth - 1986 - Dialogue 25 (4):821-823.
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  49. The Principles of the Most Ancient and Modern Philosophy Anne Conway Edited and with an Introduction by Peter Loptson International Archives of the History of Ideas, vol. 101 The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, 1982. Pp. 252. [REVIEW]E. J. Ashworth - 1986 - Dialogue 25 (4):821-.
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  50. Anne Conway: The Principles of the most Ancient and Modern Philosophy.R. S. Woolhouse - 1983 - Philosophical Books 24 (2):76-76.
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