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  1. Ancient political philosophy.Melissa Lane - forthcoming - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  2. Warding off the Evil Eye: Peer Envy in Rawls's Just Society.James S. Pearson - forthcoming - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie.
    This article critically analyzes Rawls’s attitude toward envy. In A Theory of Justice, Rawls is predominantly concerned with the threat that class envy poses to political stability. Yet he also briefly discusses the kind of envy that individuals experience toward their social peers, which he calls particular envy, and which I refer to as peer envy. He quickly concludes, however, that particular envy would not present a serious risk to the stability of his just society. In this article, I contest (...)
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  3. Political Phantasies: Aristotle on Imagination and Collective Action.Avshalom M. Schwartz - forthcoming - American Journal of Political Science.
    This article provides a new account of the role of phantasia, imagination, in Aristotle's political thought. Phantasia plays a key role in Aristotle's psychology and is crucial for explaining any kind of movement and action. I argue that this insight holds for collective actions as well. By offering a reconsideration of the famous “Wisdom of the Multitude” passage, this article shows that the capacity of a multitude to act together is tied to its ability to share a collective phantasma: a (...)
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  4. Artemisia of Halicarnassus: Herodotus’ excellent counsel.Thornton C. Lockwood - 2023 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 116:147–172.
    Numerous ancient sources attest that Artemisia of Halicarnassus, a fifth-century BCE tyrant whose polis came under Persian rule in 524 BCE, figures prominently in Xerxes’ naval campaign against Greece. At least since Pompeius Trogus’ first-century BCE Philippic History, interpretations of Artemisia have juxtaposed her “virile courage” (uirilem audaciam) with Xerxes’ “womanish fear” (muliebrem timorem) primarily as a means of belittling the effeminate non-Greeks. My paper argues that although Herodotus is aware of such interpretations of Artemisia, he depicts her primarily as (...)
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  5. Bene vivere politice: On the (Meta)biopolitics of "Happiness".Jussi Backman - 2022 - In Jussi Backman & Antonio Cimino (eds.), Biopolitics and Ancient Thought. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 126-144.
    This chapter approaches the question of biopolitics in ancient political thought looking not at specific political techniques but at notions of the final aim of the political community. It argues that the “happiness” (eudaimonia, beatitudo) that constitutes the greatest human good in the tradition from Aristotle to Thomas Aquinas is not a “biopolitical” ideal, but rather a metabiopolitical one, consisting in a contemplative activity situated above and beyond the biological and the political. It is only with Thomas Hobbes that civic (...)
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  6. Biopolitics and Ancient Thought.Jussi Backman & Antonio Cimino (eds.) - 2022 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    The volume studies, from different perspectives, the relationship between ancient thought and biopolitics, that is, theories, discourses, and practices in which the biological life of human populations becomes the focal point of political government. It thus continues and deepens the critical examination, in recent literature, of Michel Foucault's claim concerning the essentially modern character of biopolitics. The nine contributions comprised in the volume explore and utilize the notions of biopolitics and biopower as conceptual tools for articulating the differences and continuities (...)
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  7. Introduction to Biopolitics and Ancient Thought.Jussi Backman & Antonio Cimino - 2022 - In Jussi Backman & Antonio Cimino (eds.), Biopolitics and Ancient Thought. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 1-11.
    In the introduction to the volume, the editors explain the overarching aim of the volume and contextualize the main themes of its chapters. Even if the notions of biopolitics and biopower have played a crucial role in philosophy, the humanities, and the social sciences over the last decades, they have been used in various and at times diverging senses, which has also produced different narratives about the history of biopolitics. The main aim of the volume is to clarify whether and (...)
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  8. Platonova kritika tiranije.Maša Danilović - 2022 - Filozofske Studije 38:79-96.
    Rad se bavi temom tiranije u Platonovoj filozofiji koja je neraskidivno vezana za Platonovu kritiku demokratije. Stoga, da bi se uopšte moglo govoriti o njegovoj kritici tiranije, u radu će biti prikazana i sva druga društvena uređenja koja on pominje i čija smjenjivanja bivaju odslikana kroz živopisnu paralelu smjene generacija. Izložiću njegov argument zašto su tiranin i tiranija u potpunom opozitu sa njegovom idealnom državom i kraljem filozofom, ali takođe i postaviti mnogobrojna ključna pitanja koja će u radu biti podijeljena (...)
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  9. Statecraft and Self-Government: On the Task of the Statesman in Plato’s Statesman.Jeffrey J. Fisher - 2022 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 9 (27).
    In this paper I argue that, according to Plato’s Statesman, true statesmen directly control, administer, or govern none of the affairs of the city. Rather, administration and governance belong entirely to the citizens. Instead of governing the city, the task of the statesman is to facilitate the citizens’ successful self-governance or self-rule. And true statesmen do this through legislation, by means of which they inculcate in the citizens true opinions about the just, the good, the fine, and the opposites of (...)
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  10. Striking at the Heart of Cognition: Aristotelian Phantasia, Working Memory, and Psychological Explanation.Javier Gomez-Lavin & Justin Humphreys - 2022 - Medicina Nei Secoli: Journal of History of Medicine and Medical Humanities 34 (2):13-38.
    This paper examines a parallel between Aristotle’s account of phantasia and contemporary psychological models of working memory, a capacity that enables the temporary maintenance and manipulation of information used in many behaviors. These two capacities, though developed within two distinct scientific paradigms, share a common strategy of psychological explanation, Aristotelian Faculty Psychology. This strategy individuates psychological components by their target-domains and functional roles. Working memory and phantasia result from an attempt to individuate the psychological components responsible for flexible thought and (...)
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  11. Aliens and Monsters: Aristotle’s Hypothetical “Defense” of Natural Slavery.William Harwood - 2022 - Dialogue and Universalism 32 (2):103-125.
    This paper examines Aristotle’s discussion of slavery, showing his description of actual slavery to be an indictment and those regarding natural slavery to be a hypothetical investigation of a separate kind. Aristotle not only precludes the inclusion of natural slaves and freepersons in a single natural kind, but also articulates such bizarre requirements for natural slaves that they ultimately cannot exist. While this reading avoids notorious difficulties associated with Aristotle’s discussion of slaves, it replaces them with impossible preconditions for just (...)
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  12. Aristotle on the Demise and Stability of Political Systems.Manuel Knoll - 2022 - Araucaria 25 (49):393–412. Translated by Knoll Manuel.
    This article examines Aristotle’s theory of ‘factional conflict’ (stasis) in Book 5 of the Politics and claims that it is mainly directed against the a-historical account of constitutional change Plato develops in the Republic. Aristotle’s investigation of the causes of stasis is oriented towards the normative political goal of stabilizing political orders and preventing their ‘change’ (metabolê) into different ones. This article argues that the constitution Aristotle calls ‘polity’ (politeia) constitutes his solution to the challenge of stabilizing democracies and oligarchies. (...)
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  13. Dangerous Counsel. Accountability and Advice in Ancient Greece, written by Matthew Landauer.Cinzia Arruzza - 2021 - Polis 38 (2):336-339.
  14. The Concept of Isēgoria.Alex Gottesman - 2021 - Polis 38 (2):175-198.
    This paper examines the concept of isēgoria. It looks especially at Herodotus, comparing his use of the term to that of other authors. The term does not primarily refer to ‘the equal right to speak in the assembly’. Rather, it is a ‘language ideology’ that characterizes the bearing of the free, full citizen. Isēgoria was a negative concept, defined by what it was not more than what it was: not flattery; not fearful; not indirect. Isēgoria could only exist in a (...)
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  15. Can the multitude be philosophic? – Myth, Reason, and Politics.Justin P. Holt - 2021 - Academia Letters 2846 (Article 2846.).
    In his Republic, Plato argues that self-rulership cannot be widespread enough in a populace due to structural failures of education. This means that rulership by the few with the use of manipulative mythological devices is inevitable. That is, if a populace cannot rule themselves through the use of their reason, then they will be ruled by others through the use of myth, at best, and at worst, violence. Even given this rather grim conclusion, if we closely examine what Plato has (...)
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  16. 'Gramsci and Ancient Philosophy: Prelude to a Study' (Please contact me for proofs).Phillip Sidney Horky - 2021 - In Emilio Zucchetti & Anna Maria Cimino (eds.), Antonio Gramsci and the Classics. London, UK: pp. 86-100.
    This chapter investigates the precise ways in which Antonio Gramsci engaged with ancient philosophy. A brief examination of the longest discussion in the Prison Notebooks of any ancient philosopher or text, Plato’s Republic (Q8, §22), raises many questions about Gramsci’s approach to ancient philosophy. These questions motivate an investigation into Gramsci’s surprisingly minimal discussion of ancient philosophy and philosophers, which is best explained in the light of his theoretical commitments to his distinctive species of historical materialism. Rather than responding to (...)
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  17. Aristophanes and Politics. New Studies, edited by Ralph M. Rosen and Helene P. Foley.Nikoletta Kanavou - 2021 - Polis 38 (2):340-345.
  18. What Thomas More learned about Utopia from Herodotus.Thornton Lockwood - 2021 - In Jan Opsomer & Pierre Destrée (eds.), Ancient Utopian Thought. Berlin, Germany: pp. 57-76.
    In Thomas More’s Utopia, the character of Raphael Hythloday bestows upon the islanders of Utopia a library of Greek authors that includes Herodotus (alongside more traditional political thinkers such as Plato, Aristotle, and Thucydides). Herodotus’ inclusion on the Utopian reading list invites the question of whether his Histories is in any sense a work in utopian political theory. Although Herodotus is sometimes excluded from the canon of the Histories of political thought because of his lack of interest in political constitutions, (...)
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  19. Plato's Conception of Justice and the Question of Human Dignity: Second Edition, Revised and Extended.Marek Piechowiak - 2021 - Berlin: Peter Lang International Academic Publishers.
    Contents 1 Introduction / 2 The Timaeus on dignity: the Demiurge’s speech / 3 Justice as a virtue / 4 The content of just actions / 5 Justice of the law and justice of the state / 6 Equality / 7 Some key issues in Plato’s conception of justice / 7.1 What is more excellent—justice of the soul or justice of action? / 7.2 Which activity is best and what is its best object? / 7.2. Just actions over contemplation / (...)
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  20. Democratic Law in Classical Athens, written by Michael Gagarin.Christine Plastow - 2021 - Polis 38 (2):332-335.
  21. Democracy and goodness: A historicist political theory.Anders Berg-Sørensen - 2020 - Contemporary Political Theory 19 (S4):235-238.
  22. Paideía y utopía en la crítica de Hans-Georg Gadamer al Platón de Julius Stenzel y Kurt Singer.Facundo Bey - 2020 - In Yanina Benitez (ed.), Intersecciones. Reelaboraciones de la filosofía contemporánea y la estética filosófica. Porto:
    In this chapter, I analyze how Gadamer criticizes in his review "Die neue-Platoforschung" [1933] both Stenzel's and Singer's reading of the "political Plato" through his own interpretations of the concepts of paideía and utopia. This Gadamer's early insight is a seminal exercise for his later theoretical developments in texts like Plato und die Dichter [1934] and Platos Staat der Erziehung [1942].// How to cite this item: Bey, Facundo. (2020). “Paideía y utopía en la crítica de Hans-Georg Gadamer al Platón de (...)
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  23. On ‘aristocratic’ dignity.Adam Etinson - 2020 - European Journal of Political Theory 19 (3):399-407.
    In his recent book, Andrea Sangiovanni raises various objections against what he calls the “aristocratic” conception of dignity – the idea that dignity represents a kind of high- ranking social status. In this short article, I suggest that Sangiovanni gives the aristocrats less credit than they deserve. Not only do his objections target an uncharitably narrow version of the view, Sangiovanni surreptitiously incorporates aspects of the aristocratic conception of dignity into his own (supposedly non-dignitarian) theory of moral equality.
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  24. Demochronos: The political time of the Athenian democracy.Mykolas Gudelis - 2020 - Constellations 27 (3):375-384.
  25. 'Anonymus Iamblichi, On Excellence (Peri Aretês): A Lost Defense of Democracy'.Phillip Sidney Horky - 2020 - In D. Wolfsdorf (ed.), Early Greek Ethics. Oxford, UK: pp. 262-92.
    In 1889, the German philologist Friedrich Blass isolated a section of Chapter 20 from Iamblichus’ Exhortation to Philosophy (mid- or late 3rd Century CE) as an extract from a lost sophistic or philosophical treatise from the late 5th Century BCE. In this article, I introduce the text, which is now known as 'Anonymus Iamblichi' (or 'the anonymous work preserved in Iamblichus') by appeal to its two main contexts (source preservation and original historical composition), translate and discuss all eight surviving fragments (...)
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  26. Plato's Myth of Er and the Reconfiguration of Nature.Tae-Yeoun Keum - 2020 - American Political Science Review 114 (1):54 - 67.
    Why did Plato conclude the Republic, arguably his most celebrated work of political theory, with the Myth of Er, an obscure story of indeterminate political-theoretical significance? This paper advances a novel reading of the Myth of Er that attends to the common plot that it shares with two earlier narrative interludes in the Republic. It suggests that Plato constructed the myth as an account of a search, akin to the sorting of potential philosopher-kings that underwrites the kallipolis’ educational curriculum, for (...)
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  27. Book Review: A Duty to Resist: When Disobedience Should Be Uncivil, by Candice Delmas. [REVIEW]Jennet Kirkpatrick - 2020 - Political Theory 48 (4):528-533.
  28. ὁμόνοια: The Hinge of Aristotle’s Ethics_ and _Politics?Thornton C. Lockwood - 2020 - Dialogue 59 (1):7-30.
    Les études sur les ramifications politiques de la conception aristotélicienne de l’amitié ont été consacrées à «l’amitié politique» et ont perdu de vue l’importance de sa description de la «concorde» (ὁμόνοια). Cela s’explique par un certain nombre de raisons, dont la plus importante est qu’Aristote offre un compte rendu précis de la concorde, mais qu’il n’a presque rien à dire sur l’amitié politique. Mon article examine les aspects éthiques et politiques de la concorde à la lumière d’un désaccord entre Richard (...)
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  29. Nexo ético-político de la justicia aristotélica. Una propuesta en la virtud para el bienestar social.Estiven Valencia Marin - 2020 - Análisis 52 (97):307-325.
    Adentrarse en el pensamiento político de la Grecia clásica es retornar a las acepciones éticas proferidas por los filósofos de ese momento, como, en este caso, de Platón y de su discípulo Aristóteles, cuyos intereses por la comprensión racional de la conducta humana no eran más que una diáfana preocupación por la consecución del bienestar de los individuos al interior de las ciudades griegas, donde se consideraba de gran importancia la formación de ideas, instituciones y asociaciones. En efecto, los vínculos (...)
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  30. Democracy, Equality and Justice in Ancient Greece: Historical and Philosophical Perspectives. Edited by GeorgiosAnagnostopoulos and GerasimosSantas. Pp. xv, 316, Springer, 2018, $139.99/€117.69. [REVIEW]Robin Waterfield - 2020 - Heythrop Journal 61 (1):145-146.
  31. Distinguishing the virtuous city of Alfarabi from that of Plato in light of his unique historical context.Ishraq Ali & Mingli Qin - 2019 - HTS Theological Studies 75 (4):9.
    There is a tendency among scholars to identify Alfarabi’s political philosophy in general and his theory of the state in particular with that of Plato’s The Republic. Undoubtedly Alfarabi was well versed in the philosophy of Plato and was greatly influenced by it. He borrows the Platonic concept of the philosopher king and uses it in his theory of the state. However, we argue that the identification of Alfarabi’s virtuous city with that of Plato’s The Republic is an inaccurate assessment (...)
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  32. Aristotle and the problem of oligarchic harm: Insights for democracy.Gordon Arlen - 2019 - European Journal of Political Theory 18 (3):393-414.
    This essay identifies ‘oligarchic harm’ as a dire threat confronting contemporary democracies. I provide a formal standard for classifying oligarchs: those who use personal access to concentrated wealth to pursue harmful forms of discretionary influence. I then use Aristotle to think through both the moral and the epistemic dilemmas of oligarchic harm, highlighting Aristotle’s concerns about the difficulties of using wealth as a ‘proxy’ for virtue. While Aristotle’s thought provides great resources for diagnosing oligarchic threats, it proves less useful as (...)
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  33. Models of Inclusion and Exclusion in Democracy Ancient and Modern: A Response to Paul Cartledge’s Democracy: A Life.Carol Atack - 2019 - Philosophy and Public Issues - Filosofia E Questioni Pubbliche 9 (2):13-31.
  34. What is Ancient Political Thinking?Vilius Bartninkas - 2019 - Problemos 96.
    This paper examines the origins of ancient political thinking from 750 to 348 B.C. The analysis of authors who had been discussing political questions over this period shows that ancient political thinking can be classified into three discourses: political thought, political theory, and political philosophy. The purpose of this paper is to define the characteristics of each discourse and to illustrate them with specific historical examples which show how these discourses interacted with the Greek political experiences and how political thought (...)
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  35. Between Justice and Accumulation: Aristotle on Currency and Reciprocity.Stefan Eich - 2019 - Political Theory 47 (3):363-390.
    For Aristotle, a just political community has to find similarity in difference and foster habits of reciprocity. Conventionally, speech and law have been seen to fulfill this role. This article reconstructs Aristotle’s conception of currency as a political institution of reciprocal justice. By placing Aristotle’s treatment of reciprocity in the context of the ancient politics of money, currency emerges not merely as a medium of economic exchange but also potentially as a bond of civic reciprocity, a measure of justice, and (...)
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  36. Redefining anarchy: from metaphysics to politics.Sotirios Frantzanas - 2019 - Dissertation, University of Glasgow
    This study is inspired by the current debate between the traditional anarchist views, the post-left and post-anarchist understandings of anarchy. It claims that the depictions of anarchy by both sides are primarily negative and develops an original and positive definition of anarchy. In particular, it argues that anarchy is the concept that refers to a way of being with the cosmos and thus instead of being posterior to the political it is in fact prior to it. This is to say, (...)
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  37. Deliberation, unjust exclusion, and the rhetorical turn.Steven Gormley - 2019 - Contemporary Political Theory 18 (2):202-226.
    Theories of deliberative democracy have faced the charge of leading to the unjust exclusion of voices from public deliberation. The recent rhetorical turn in deliberative theory aims to respond to this charge. I distinguish between two variants of this response: the supplementing approach and the systemic approach. On the supplementing approach, rhetorical modes of political speech may legitimately supplement the deliberative process, for the sake of those excluded from the latter. On the systemic approach, rhetorical modes of political speech are (...)
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  38. Virtue and Law in Plato and Beyond, written by Julia Annas. [REVIEW]Zena Hitz - 2019 - Polis 36 (3):574-580.
  39. CAREY Democracy in Classical Athens. Second edition. London and New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 2017 . Pp. xvi + 181, ills, maps. Paper, £14.99. ISBN: 978-1-4742-8636-7. [REVIEW]Matthew Landauer - 2019 - The Classical Review 69 (1):334-334.
  40. El llanto y la pólis.Aida Míguez Barciela - 2019 - Madrid: La Oficina de Arte y Ediciones.
    Partiendo de Homero, se emprende una lectura de ciertas tragedias de Sófocles y de Eurípides. Alcestis muere por la belleza; Medea se queda en el aire; la casa se ha corrompido y la pólis ha caído enferma. Para implantar el nuevo proyecto político y apostar con determinación por la igualdad ciudadana, la pólis debía contener el llanto y reprimir las lágrimas por los parientes muertos, lo cual exigía contener y reprimir a las mujeres. Este ensayo intenta comprender en qué sentido (...)
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  41. ΠΟΙΕΙΝ ΤΕΧΝΑΣ ΤΟΙΣ ΝΟΜΟΙΣ - (C.) Carey, (I.) Giannadaki, (B.) Griffith-Williams (edd.) Use and Abuse of Law in the Athenian Courts. ( Mnemosyne Supplements 419.) Pp. xvi + 385. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2019. Cased, €110, US$132. ISBN: 978-90-04-37787-5. [REVIEW]Kyriaco Nikias - 2019 - The Classical Review 69 (2):391-393.
  42. Richesse et pauvreté chez les philosophes de l’antiquité, edited by Étienne Helmer. [REVIEW]Carol Atack - 2018 - Polis 35 (2):591-593.
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  43. Plato as Critical Theorist.Tristan Bradshaw - 2018 - Contemporary Political Theory:1-4.
  44. Positive Freedom and the Citizen in Athens.Naomi T. Campa - 2018 - Polis 35 (1):1-32.
    Freedom in democratic Athens is often understood as consisting of positive freedom in the public sphere in the form of political participation and negative freedom in the private sphere in the form of citizens doing ‘whatever they wish’. The original meaning of positive freedom, though, is more akin to self-mastery than political participation. By looking at phrases describing Athenians’ ability to do ‘whatever they wish’ from Herodotus to Aristotle, this article argues that the phrases instead express individual positive freedom in (...)
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  45. Cosmic Democracy or Cosmic Monarchy? Empedocles in Plato’s Statesman.Cameron F. Coates - 2018 - Polis 35 (2):418-446.
    Plato’s references to Empedocles in the myth of the Statesman perform a crucial role in the overarching political argument of the dialogue. Empedocles conceives of the cosmos as structured like a democracy, where the constituent powers ‘rule in turn’, sharing the offices of rulership equally via a cyclical exchange of power. In a complex act of philosophical appropriation, Plato takes up Empedocles’ cosmic cycles of rule in order to ‘correct’ them: instead of a democracy in which rule is shared cyclically (...)
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  46. Cynic cosmopolitanism.Jason Dockstader - 2018 - European Journal of Political Theory 20 (2):272-289.
    Recently, British Prime Minister Theresa May made a bold anti-cosmopolitan claim: ‘If you believe you are a citizen of the world, you are a citizen of nowhere. You don’t understand what citizenship...
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  47. Aristoteles als Begründer der Theorie politischer Revolutionen.Manuel Dr Knoll - 2018 - In Hans-Martin Schönherr-Mann (ed.), Revolution 100 Years After. System, Geschichte, Struktur und Performanz einer ökonomischen Theorie. Norderstedt: pp. 31–46.
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  48. The constitution of the athenians in italian and in English - Rhodes aristotele: Costituzione degli ateniesi. Translated by A. zambrini and T. gargiulo. Pp. lii + 402. Rome / Milan: Fondazione Lorenzo valla / arnoldo Mondadori, 2016. Cased, €35. Isbn: 978-88-04-67169-5. - Rhodes the athenian constitution written in the school of Aristotle. Pp. XII + 441, maps. Liverpool: Liverpool university press, 2017. Paper, £19.99 . Isbn: 978-1-78694-837-3. [REVIEW]Alberto Esu - 2018 - The Classical Review 68 (2):366-369.
  49. The role of character in athenian courts - adamidis character evidence in the courts of classical athens. Rhetoric, relevance and the rule of law. Pp. VIII + 235. London and new York: Routledge, 2017. Cased, £105, us$149.95. Isbn: 978-1-472-48369-0. [REVIEW]Edward M. Harris - 2018 - The Classical Review 68 (2):484-485.
  50. Ismard Democracy's Slaves. A Political History of Ancient Greece. Translated by Jane Marie Todd. Pp. xii + 188. Cambridge, MA and London: Harvard University Press, 2017 . Cased, £25.95, €31.50, US$35. ISBN: 978-0-674-66007-6. [REVIEW]William Mack - 2018 - The Classical Review 68 (2):608-609.
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