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  1. The state of research on Aristotle’s Politics.Thornton Lockwood - forthcoming - In C. J. Nederman & G. Bogiaris-Thibault (eds.), Research Handbook on the History of Political Thought.
    Aristotle’s Politics is a study of the political institutions of the 4th C. Mediterranean world, including both Greek communities (like Athens and Sparta) and non-Greek communities (like Persia and Carthage). The work is foundational for a number of modern scholarly disciplines such as political science, political theory, ancient history, and ancient philosophy; thus, the work annually is the subject of a robust number of scholarly studies (on average, about four monographs and 25 journal articles and book chapters per year). This (...)
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  2. The Dangerous Game of Persuasion.Eric Brown - 2024 - The Common Reader 1 (49).
  3. Ambiguities of Despotic Power in Xenophon’s Cyropaedia.Carol Atack - 2023 - Cahiers «Mondes Anciens». Histoire Et Anthropologie des Mondes Anciens 17.
    The ambiguity of Xenophon’s Cyropaedia, a fictionalised portrait of Cyrus the Great and his rise to rule an empire, has led present-day interpretations to diverge widely. Should Cyrus be seen as an ideal king, whose capabilities exceed those of other rulers, or a despot whose ascent to power depends on deception and manipulation? This paper uses the modern conceptualisation of transgression to look at Xenophon’s careful depiction of political and personal boundaries throughout the work. It suggests that the key final (...)
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  4. Old Men in Cicero's Political Philosophy.Sean McConnell - 2023 - In Power and Persuasion in Cicero's Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. pp. 218-240.
    In his philosophical works Cicero addresses a number of questions concerning the role of old men in politics, most obviously in his dialogue De senectute of 44 BCE. How best should the old participate in politics and the wider community—what, if anything, do the old have to offer that is special or unique? How should the generations fit together in the body politic, and should age be a factor in the structural organisation of states? Should the old rule? This chapter (...)
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  5. 9 Über den Vorrang der Gemeinschaft in Ciceros Ethik der Wohltaten (Off. 2.52–85).Stefan Röttig - 2023 - In Jörn Müller & Philipp Brüllmann (eds.), Cicero: De officiis. Berlin/Boston: De Gruyter. pp. 143-160.
    Why should we do good deeds for each other, or to what end? Ancient ethicists often declare personal happiness as the highest good or telos and explore its nature and the means to achieve it. But in De officiis, the focus shifts towards the community, particularly the res publica. Cicero is primarily concerned with its formation or preservation, viewing beneficence (beneficentia/liberalitas/benignitas) as a key tool in this endeavor. The idea that beneficence is advantageous for the community is not a new (...)
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  6. Power and persuasion in Cicero's philosophy.Nathan Gilbert, Margaret Graver & Sean McConnell (eds.) - 2022 - New York, NY, USA: Cambridge University Press.
    This interdisciplinary volume will be essential reading for students and scholars working on Greco-Roman philosophy, Roman rhetoric, and the history and literary culture of the Roman Republic. It showcases innovative methodological approaches to Cicero the philosopher and defines new directions for the immediate future of the field.
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  7. Private and Public Behaviour in Polybius.Simone Rendina - 2022 - Historika 12:119-128.
    Polybius’ Histories represent a fundamental step in the ancient debate about whether individuals who are virtuous in public are also necessarily virtuous in private. The historian argued that the uprightness in the public life of politicians must reflect their uprightness in private life. Before Polybius, this theme had only been analysed in depth by Aristotle, although a connection between the reflections of the two authors cannot be demonstrated.
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  8. The Rhetoric of the Past in Demosthenes and Aeschines: Oratory, History, and Politics in Classical Athens, written by Guy Westwood.Matteo Barbato - 2021 - Polis 38 (2):355-357.
  9. A Cultural History of Democracy: V. 1, Cultural History of Democracy in Antiquity.Paul Cartledge & Carol Atack (eds.) - 2021 - London: Bloomsbury Academic.
  10. The sixth century - (m.) Kruse the politics of Roman memory. From the fall of the western empire to the age of Justinian. Pp. X + 292. Philadelphia: University of pennsylvania press, 2019. Cased, £52, us$65. Isbn: 978-0-8122-5162-3. [REVIEW]F. K. Haarer - 2021 - The Classical Review 71 (1):179-181.
  11. Decrees of Fourth-Century Athens (403/2–322/1), written by Peter Liddel.Danielle L. Kellogg - 2021 - Polis 38 (2):351-354.
  12. Pandering for the Greater Good? Senate, People, and Politics in Cicero’s de lege agraria 1 and 2.Brian Krostenko - 2021 - Polis 38 (1):108-126.
    Cicero’s first speeches as consul, de lege agraria I and II, delivered to the senate and the people respectively, are virtually identical in outline and broad argument. That allows the rhetorical technique of individual sections to be compared closely. This article uses such comparisons to probe the tactics and ideology of the speeches. In both Cicero’s choice of word and phrase might suggest that he is simply addressing his audiences as suits their stations. But a consideration of the circumstances of (...)
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  13. Review of M. Schofield (2021) Cicero: Political Philosophy (Oxford University Press)’. [REVIEW]Sean McConnell - 2021 - Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2021.
  14. Cicero and the golden age tradition.Sean McConnell - 2021 - In Utopias in Ancient Thought. Berlin, Germany: pp. 213–230.
    This paper examines Cicero’s engagement with the golden age tradition of utopian thinking, which is prominent not only in Greek literature but also in Plato and the Peripatetic and Stoic philosophical traditions. It makes the case that in De re publica and later philosophical works such as the Tusculan Disputations Cicero draws on philosophical accounts of the golden age—most significantly that of the Peripatetic Dicaearchus of Messana (c.350–c.285 BC)—in his analysis of the Roman res publica and the nature of Roman (...)
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  15. Le divin, les dieux et le mouvement éternel dans l’univers d’Anaximandre.Luan Reboredo - 2021 - In Rossella Saetta Cottone (ed.), Penser les dieux avec les présocratiques. Paris: Rue D’Ulm. pp. 97-111.
    On propose ici de clarifier ce qu’Anaximandre entendait par « le divin » et ce qu’il appelait des « dieux ». À partir d’une réévaluation des sources anciennes, on soutient que cette enquête peut aider à comprendre son modèle cosmologique et le problème des cataclysmes dans son système. Trois hypothèses sont avancées à cette fin : [i] que dans Physique, III, 4, 203b3 15, le syntagme τὸ ἄπειρον renvoie à une notion concrète de substrat infini ; [ii] que dans ce (...)
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  16. The Tyrant’s Progress: The Meaning of ΤΥΡΑΝΝΟΣ in Plato and Aristotle.Edmund Stewart - 2021 - Polis 38 (2):208-236.
    This article considers a longstanding problem: what does the word τύραννος mean? And if it means ‘bad / tyrannical ruler’, why are good rulers called tyrants? The solution proposed here is that tyranny is not a fixed state of being, or not being, but instead a gradual process of development. To be called a tyrant, a ruler need not embody all the stereotypical traits of tyranny. If tyranny is, by definition, unconstitutional and illegitimate rule, then there may be no clear (...)
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  17. The Deaths of the Republic: Imagery of the Body Politic in Ciceronian Rome, written by Brian Walters.Henriette van der Blom - 2021 - Polis 38 (2):367-370.
  18. Tertullian on ‘The Freedom of Religion’.Jed W. Atkins - 2020 - Polis 37 (1):145-175.
    Tertullian first coined the phrase ‘the freedom of religion’. This article considers what this entails. I argue that Tertullian’s discussion of religious liberty derives its theoretical significance from his creative repurposing of the Roman idea of liberty as non-domination. Tertullian contends that the Roman magistrates’ treatment of Christian citizens and loyal subjects amounts to tyrannical domination characterized by the absence of the traditional conditions for non-domination: the rule of law, rule in and responsive to the interests of the people, and (...)
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  19. A revised translation of cicero's de re publica and de legibus - (j.E.g.) Zetzel (trans.) Cicero: On the commonwealth and on the laws. Second edition. Pp. lx + 212. Cambridge: Cambridge university press, 2017 (first edition 1999). Paper, £17.99 (cased, us$54.99). Isbn: 978-1-316-50556-4 (978-1-107-14006-6 hbk). [REVIEW]Thomas J. B. Cole - 2020 - The Classical Review 70 (2):377-378.
  20. ‘Law and literature’ in tacitus - (j.) Petersen Recht bei tacitus. Pp. XX + 617. Berlin and boston: De gruyter, 2019. Cased, £72.50, €79.95, us$91.99. Isbn: 978-3-11-057988-8. [REVIEW]Kimberley Czajkowski - 2020 - The Classical Review 70 (1):126-128.
  21. Politics and Philosophy at Rome: Collected Papers, edited by Miriam T. Griffin and Catalina Balmaceda.Alex Dressler - 2020 - Polis 37 (1):181-184.
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  22. The Return of the Romans. [REVIEW]Dean Hammer - 2020 - Political Theory 48 (3):390-400.
  23. The Return of the Romans.Dean Hammer - 2020 - Political Theory 48 (3):390-400.
  24. The Roman Republic and the Crisis of American Democracy: Echoes of the Past.Dean Hammer - 2020 - Polis 37 (1):95-122.
    My starting point is a fundamental paradox that lies at the heart of the slow demise of the Roman Republic: why does the system collapse when, as many scholars have noted, there is nothing that suggests that there was ever an intention by anyone to overthrow the Republic? Understanding this paradox is key to identifying what Rome might have to say to us today. What changes in the final decades of the Roman Republic is a declining view of the ability (...)
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  25. ‘The Protectorate of the World’: the Problem of Just Hegemony in Roman Thought.Michael Hawley - 2020 - Polis 37 (1):44-71.
    Contemporary normative theory is understandably reluctant to consider how a hegemonic power ought to conduct itself. After all, a truly just international order, characterised by principles of freedom and equality among nations, would not include one polity so able to dominate others. The natural impulse of normative theorists then is to seek to eliminate such an imbalance. Yet, a sober assessment of political reality provides little prospect for such aspirations. The more modest alternative is to examine how hegemonic power might (...)
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  26. 'Anonymus Iamblichi, On Excellence (Peri Aretês): A Lost Defense of Democracy'.Phillip Sidney Horky - 2020 - In D. Wolfsdorf (ed.), Early Greek Ethics. Oxford, UK: pp. 262-92.
    In 1889, the German philologist Friedrich Blass isolated a section of Chapter 20 from Iamblichus’ Exhortation to Philosophy (mid- or late 3rd Century CE) as an extract from a lost sophistic or philosophical treatise from the late 5th Century BCE. In this article, I introduce the text, which is now known as 'Anonymus Iamblichi' (or 'the anonymous work preserved in Iamblichus') by appeal to its two main contexts (source preservation and original historical composition), translate and discuss all eight surviving fragments (...)
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  27. The City as a Living Organism: Aristotle’s Naturalness Thesis Reconsidered.Xinkai Hu - 2020 - History of Political Thought 41 (4):517-537.
    In this paper, I wish to defend Aristotle’s naturalness thesis. First, I argue against the claim that the city fails to meet the criteria (e.g. separability, continuity, etc.) Aristotle sets for substantiality in the Metaphysics. Second, I examine the problem of the Principle of Transitivity of End in Aristotle’s telic argument for the naturalness of the city. I argue that the city exists for its own end. Finally, I discuss the problem of the legislator in the genesis of the city. (...)
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  28. The athenian constitution - (f.) carugati creating a constitution. Law, democracy, and growth in ancient athens. Pp. XIV + 239, figs, map. Princeton and oxford: Princeton university press, 2019. Cased, £30, us$39.95. Isbn: 978-0-691-19563-6. [REVIEW]Nicholas F. Jones - 2020 - The Classical Review 70 (2):419-421.
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  29. Letter from the Editor-in-Chief of Polis.Thornton Lockwood - 2020 - Polis 37 (1):1-2.
    It gives me great pleasure and honor to introduce myself as the incoming Editor-in-Chief of Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek and Roman Political Thought. For the last decade I have served as an Associate Editor and the Book Review Editor of the journal. I am very excited about charting new paths for the journal, while continuing to publish first-rate scholarship in our area strengths. Although ‘polis’ is a Greek word that identifies a specific Greek historical political institution, in many (...)
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  30. Introduction to Polis Special Issue on Roman Political Thought.Grant Nelsestuen & Daniel Kapust - 2020 - Polis 37 (1):3-6.
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  31. Leaving the State of Nature: Polybius on Resentment and the Emergence of Morals and Political Order.Benjamin Straumann - 2020 - Polis 37 (1):9-43.
    The possibility of cooperation and the stability of political order are long-standing problems. Polybius, well known for his Histories analysing the expansion of Rome and his description of the Roman constitution, also offers an intriguing social and political theory that covers ground from psycho-anthropological micro-foundations to institution-based political order, providing a genealogy of morals and political order that is best understood in game-theoretical terms. In this paper I try to give such an interpretation. Polybius’ naturalistic, proto-game theoretical views show similarities (...)
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  32. The Socratic Way of Life: Xenophon’s Memorabilia, written by Thomas L. Pangle.Harold Tarrant - 2020 - Polis 37 (2):378-381.
  33. The Politics of Socratic Humor, written by John Lombardini.John Zumbrunnen - 2020 - Polis 37 (2):356-358.
  34. Models of Inclusion and Exclusion in Democracy Ancient and Modern: A Response to Paul Cartledge’s Democracy: A Life.Carol Atack - 2019 - Philosophy and Public Issues - Filosofia E Questioni Pubbliche 9 (2):13-31.
  35. The Discourse of Kingship in Classical Greece.Carol Atack - 2019 - Abingdon: Routledge.
    This book examines how ancient authors explored ideas of kingship as a political role fundamental to the construction of civic unity, the use of kingship stories to explain the past and present unity of the polis and the distinctive function or status attributed to kings in such accounts. -/- It explores the notion of kingship offered by historians such as Herodotus, as well as dramatists writing for the Athenian stage, paying particular attention to dramatic depictions of the unique capabilities of (...)
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  36. Free to think? Epistemic authority and thinking for oneself.Ursula Coope - 2019 - British Academy 7.
    People generally agree that there is something valuable about thinking for oneself rather than simply accepting beliefs on authority, but it is not at all obvious why this is valuable. This paper discusses two ancient responses, both inspired by the example of Socrates. Cicero claims that thinking for yourself gives you freedom. Olympiodorus argues that thinking for yourself makes it possible to achieve understanding, and that understanding is valuable because it gives you a certain kind of independence. The paper asks (...)
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  37. Virtue and Law in Plato and Beyond, written by Julia Annas. [REVIEW]Zena Hitz - 2019 - Polis 36 (3):574-580.
  38. Politics and Philosophy at Rome: Collected Papers by Miriam T. Griffin.James Ker - 2019 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 113 (1):118-119.
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  39. Remparts et Philosophie aux Ve et IVe siècles.David Lévystone - 2019 - Mnemosyne 72:736-765.
    The main disciples of Socrates criticise the use of city walls. However, their attacks are less grounded in a deep strategic reflexion than related to the traumatic consequences of Pericles’ strategy at the beginning of the Peloponnesian war. The Lacedemonians’ opposition to the erection of surrounding walls is more likely linked to their aristo- cratic ideology and interests than to moral imperatives. Though Plato and Xenophon’s motives are to avoid political divisions in the city, their positions on fortifications reveal their (...)
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  40. Cicero’s Skepticism and His Recovery of Political Philosophy.William H. F. Altman - 2018 - Ancient Philosophy 38 (1):225-229.
  41. The Revival of Platonism in Cicero’s Late Philosophy: Platonis aemulus and the invention of Cicero, written by William H. F. Altman.Robert Dudley - 2018 - Polis 35 (2):582-586.
  42. Crisis and Constitutionalism: Roman Political Thought from the Fall of the Republic to the Age of Revolution, written by Benjamin Straumann.Dean Hammer - 2018 - Polis 35 (1):282-284.
  43. Lucretius on the nature of parental love.Sean McConnell - 2018 - Antichthon 52:72-89.
    This paper outlines the full details of Lucretius’ treatment of parental love. It shows that Lucretius is faithful to Epicurus’ notorious claim that parental love is not natural: in addition to orthodox Epicurean hedonist concerns, Lucretius asserts that children do not “belong to” their parents by nature; as such, even though parental love is now ubiquitous and indeed a cultural norm, there is no basis for the naturalness of parental love. This model of the relationship between parents and children does (...)
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  44. Philosophy and Political Power in Antiquity, edited by Cinzia Arruzza. [REVIEW]Sean McConnell - 2018 - Polis 35 (1):312-315.
  45. Slavery, social justice and philosophy - (I.L.e.) Ramelli social justice and the legitimacy of slavery. The role of philosophical asceticism from ancient judaism to late antiquity. Pp. XVI + 293. Oxford: Oxford university press, 2016. Cased, £70, us$99. Isbn: 978-0-19-877727-4. [REVIEW]Monica Tobon - 2018 - The Classical Review 68 (1):126-128.
  46. Virtus and the Roman historiographers - balmaceda virtus Romana. Politics and morality in the Roman historians. Pp. XIV + 297, ills. Chapel hill: The university of north Carolina press, 2017. Cased, us$45. Isbn: 978-1-46963512-5. [REVIEW]Jyri Vaahtera - 2018 - The Classical Review 68 (2):514-516.
  47. Roman Patriotism and Christian Religion.Alex V. Halapsis - 2017 - Socio-Political Processes 6 (2-3):251-267.
    Ideology is an important part of the political mechanism that helps to ensure the loyalty of citizens to the state and give it a moral basis and justification. Roman patriotism was deeply religious. The community was the subject of faith, but also faith was a state duty, a testimony of trustworthiness. Personal religiosity was res privata, but loyalty to the state cult was res publica. Roman ideology was based on respect for ancestors, respect for the institution of the family and (...)
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  48. Livy’s Political Philosophy: Power and Personality in Early Rome, written by Ann Vasaly.Daniel Kapust - 2017 - Polis 34 (1):160-163.
  49. Aristóteles y el pensamiento político aristocrático.Manuel Knoll - 2017 - Revista de filosofía (Chile) 73:87-106.
    Una Según una influyente línea interpretativa sostiene que la mejor ciudad polis ideal de Aristóteles debe ser considerada como un gobierno constitucionaluna politeia (πολιτεία). Son eruditos alemanes quienes adoptan esta lecturaEsta corriente predomina aún hoy entre los eruditos alemanes.. En este grupo hay que incluir a Martha Nussbaum en tanto que aboga por una “socialdemocracia aristotélicaEn tanto paladina de la “social democracia aristotélica”, Martha Nussbaum pertenece también a esta línea exegética ”. En oposición a tales interpretaciones, este ensayo defiende la (...)
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  50. Aristóteles y el pensamiento político aristocrático.Manuel Knoll - 2017 - Revista de Filosofía 73:87-106.
    Según una influyente línea interpretativa, la mejor polis de Aristóteles debe ser considerada una politeia. Esta corriente predomina aún hoy entre los eruditos alemanes. En tanto paladina de la “social democracia aristotélica”, Martha Nussbaum pertenece también a esta línea exegética. En oposición a tales interpretaciones, este ensayo defiende la tesis de que Aristóteles pertenece a la tradición de pensamiento político aristocrático. Esta tradición se remonta a Teognis, Heráclito y Platón y se inicia como una crítica dirigida tanto a la decadencia (...)
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