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Summary

Are aesthetics shaped by cultural contexts? How do aesthetic preferences reflect cultural values, construct identities, and foster cross-cultural dialogues? The multifaceted nature of aesthetics and culture offer insights into the intricate dynamics that underpin artistic expressions and societal norms. Aesthetics act as a lens through which individuals perceive and interpret the world around them. In that perspective, aesthetic expression can be viewed as a specific form of cultural manifestation. Artistic creations, whether visual, auditory, or performative, often serve as conduits for the expression of cultural identities, values, and narratives. Cultural aesthetics imbue art with distinctive styles, symbols, and motifs, enabling individuals to convey shared experiences and heritage. Artifacts such as traditional paintings, musical compositions, and ritualistic performances are laden with cultural significance, reflecting the collective consciousness of a society. Cultural values and beliefs shape aesthetic preferences, influencing notions of beauty and desirability. Cross-cultural variations in aesthetic ideals exemplify the diverse ways in which cultures prioritize certain visual or auditory attributes. These variations offer a window into the underlying ideologies that guide societies. The synergy between aesthetics and culture is a testament to the profound ways in which humans engage with their environment and fellow beings. The exploration of this relationship enhances our appreciation of the intricate layers that contribute to the richness of artistic and cultural landscapes, reaffirming the significance of aesthetics as a reflection of shared human experiences.

Key works Eaton 2000, Fabelo-Corzo & Romero Bello 2018, Dutton 2000, Lafrenz 2020, Nguyen 2020, Cheyne 2023, Lopes 2018, Goldblatt & Patridge 2017, De Balbian 2017
Introductions Eaton 2000, Fabelo-Corzo & Romero Bello 2018, Dutton 2000, Lafrenz 2020
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  1. Trans-Feminist Punk in The United States: Collective Action, Activism, and a Libidinal Economy of Noise.Casey Robertson - 2022 - In Jim Donaghey, Will Boisseau & Caroline Kaltefleiter (eds.), Smash the System! Punk Anarchism as a Culture of Resistance. Karlovac: Active Distribution Press. pp. 317-346.
    This chapter explores the tripartite relationship between transgender identities, political activism, and sonic practice. In particular, this chapter employs theorizations of noise to explore a rupture in the prevalent binarisms of sound and gender in the American punk scene and its aesthetics. Drawing upon theoretical frameworks such as Herbert Marcuse’s one-dimensional society and Jean-François Lyotard’s conception of a libidinal economy, the sonic practices of trans-feminist artists such as GLOSS (Girls Living Outside Society’s Shit) and the HIRS Collective are re-examined to (...)
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  2. Il vino nell’opera di R. M. Rilke con particolare riferimento al suo itinerario mediterraneo.Niketa Stefa - 2022 - In Persida Lazarevic, Ljiljana Banjanin, Andrijana Jusup Magazin, Rosanna Morabito & Svetlana Seatovic (eds.), Il vino nella cultura e nella religione sulle due sponde dell’Adriatico. Edizioni dell’Orso. pp. 199-229.
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  3. The Feminist Art Project (TFAP) and its Significance for Aesthetics.Peg Zeglin Brand Weiser - forthcoming - In Weiser Peg Zeglin Brand (ed.), Feminist Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art: Critical Visions, Creative Engagements. Springer Press.
    In 1970, art critic Linda Nochlin articulated the radical question, "Why are there no great women artists?" The Feminist Art Project is engaged in a national and international re-assessment of that question, complete with a long overdue commemoration and celebration of women artists. Given TFAP's stated emphasis on recognizing the aesthetic impact of women on the visual arts and culture, questions arise within our own philosophical community about the potential impact of TFAP, the significance of women artists, and the role (...)
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Aesthetic Universals
  1. Taste(s) and Common Sense(s).Behrang Pourhosseini - 2024 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 8 (1):13-38.
    This paper explores the relationship between common sense and taste in the history of aesthetic thought. “Common sense” guarantees the communication of tastes through different modalities. It can either facilitate agreement among individuals, fostering mutual understanding and envisaging a universal aesthetic community, or provoke disagreement. In the former scenario, common sense is literally common to everyone, while in the latter case, it implies diversity and dissensus. By associating the concept of taste with judgement and the sensible (Arendt and Rancière), we (...)
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  2. Weaving Artistic Archipelagos in Afro Diasporic Networks.Frédéric Lefrançois - 2022 - Sociocriticism 36 (1-2).
    Through the prism of archipelicity, the artistic production of the Afro-American Diaspora reveals its diffractive potential: at once close to and far from its original origins, it unfolds in the in-between of a double consciousness. In his seminal essay, Paul Gilroy calls for the overcoming of binary oppositions in order to better apprehend the complexity of Afro-diasporic intellectual culture, which he sees as specifically transnational (Gilroy, 1993). As inclusive as this theoretical framework may seem, it is challenged by the inherent (...)
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  3. Aesthetic Reason and Imaginative Freedom: Friedrich Schiller and Philosophy.María del Rosario Acosta López & Jeffrey L. Powell (eds.) - 2018 - SUNY Press.
    Shows the relevance of Schiller’s thought for contemporary philosophy, particularly aesthetics, ethics, and politics. This book seeks to draw attention to Friedrich Schiller (1759–1805) as a philosophical thinker in his own right. For too long, his philosophical contribution has been neglected in favor of his much-deserved reputation as a political playwright. The essays in this collection make two arguments. First, Schiller presents a robust philosophical program that can be favorably compared to those of his age, including Rousseau, Kant, Schelling, and (...)
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  4. State of the Art - Elements for Critical Thinking and Doing.Erich Berger, Mari Keski-Korsu, Marietta Radomska & Line Thastum (eds.) - 2023 - Helsinki: Bioart Society.
    How to participate proactively in a process of change and transformation, to shape our path within an uncertain future? With this publication, the State Of The Art Network marks a waypost on a journey which started in 2018, when like-minded Nordic and Baltic art organisations and professionals initiated this network as a multidisciplinary collaboration facing the Anthropocene. Over five years, ten organisations and around 80 practitioners from different disciplines, like the arts, natural sciences and humanities came together, online and in (...)
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  5. Understanding Aesthetics, Creativity and the Arts.Jay Friedenberg - 2020 - Amazon Direct.
    What is art? What is beauty? Why are we driven to create? People have been struggling with the answers to these questions for millenia. In this book Jay Friedenberg examines age old and contemporary responses to the perceptual and performative side of aesthetics. The work is wide-ranging in scope, addressing all forms of art including painting, photography, writing, film, music, theater, dance, and more. Issues are examined from multiple perspectives with separate chapters on history, philosophy, mathematics, physics, psychology, and neuroscience. (...)
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  6. "Belleza" de Hans-Georg Gadamer y "Belleza y burguesía" de Odo Marquard: Introducción, traducción y notas de Facundo Bey.Facundo Norberto Bey - 2023 - Boletín de Estética 65:73-93.
    Resumen: Este texto introduce la primera traducción al español de los textos Schönheit [Belleza] de Hans-Georg Gadamer (trabajo escrito en los años ’70 y que vio la luz en alemán póstumamente en 2007) y Schönheit und Bürgerlichkeit [Belleza y burguesía] de Odo Marquard, publicado también en 2007 como respuesta demorada al trabajo del filósofo de Marburgo. Gadamer explora el desarrollo histórico del concepto de belleza en los siglos XIX y XX, poniendo énfasis en que la belleza siguió y seguirá siendo (...)
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  7. Black time and the aesthetic possibility of objects.Daphne Lamothe - 2023 - Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press.
    The decades following the civil rights and decolonization movements of the sixties and seventies - termed the post-soul era - created new ways to understand the aesthetics of global racial representation. Daphne Lamothe shows that beginning around 1980 and continuing to the present day, Black literature, art, and music resisted the pull of singular and universal notions of racial identity. Developing the idea of 'Black aesthetic time' - a multipronged theoretical concept that analyzes the ways race and time collide in (...)
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  8. The Universality of Aesthetic Effects.Jane Boddy, Hanna Brinkmann, Eva Specker, Michael Forster, Helmut Leder & Raphael Rosenberg - 2023 - Zeitschrift für Ästhetik Und Allgemeine Kunstwissenschaft 68 (2):148-170.
    This paper challenges the assumption that lines, colors, and shapes have aesthetic effects that are the same for everyone. From an interdisciplinary perspective of art history and empirical aesthetics, we argue that assigning aesthetic effects to specific lines or colors may well be a valid theory for some aesthetic encounters, it falls short of explaining universal aesthetic effects. Our analysis proceeds in four steps: We begin by reconsidering the notion of aesthetic effect as defined in the tradition of Goethe. We (...)
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  9. Altera Natura: Das Anthropozän als ästhetisches Problem.Thomas Khurana - 2023 - Dritte Natur 6 (1):171-184.
    Art has long been said to open up a different relationship to nature for the subject than ordinary theoretical or practical knowledge allows. Instead of making nature the distanced object of our contemplation or the mere material and means of our practical constructions, art discloses to us an intelligibility of nature that reaches further than our concepts and a naturalness of ourselves that connects us with what we usually relate to as our other. Against this backdrop, it does not seem (...)
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  10. Selective Breeding and the Birth of Philosophy.Costin Alamariu - 2023 - Independently published.
    Based on his dissertation (Yale). -/- This is an argument that philosophy is born with and dependent on the idea of nature; and that this idea was first discovered or manifested in the perception of biological reality, in particular the perception of hereditary transmission of physical and behavioral qualities, together with the perception that moral and legal codes are relative and contingent. It was generally only within the spiritual and intellectual horizon of certain types of aristocracies to have access to (...)
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  11. L'archive artistique pancaribéenne : au carrefour de l'ontique et de l'esthétique.Frédéric Lefrançois - manuscript
    Invoquer la question des traditions au sein de l’immense aire géoculturelle des Amériques nous place d’emblée à l’entrelacement de l’ontique et de l’esthétique, dans lequel se déploie toutes les strates mémorielles de l’art pan-caribéen. Dans sa fonction inclusive, cette archive recense et fédère toute la pluriversalité de l’expérience collective et individuelle de la Diaspora. Ce grand carrefour des peuples métis nés du heurt physique, psychique et ontique de la colonisation ont toujours cherché à sanctuariser, depuis l’époque du Popol Vuh, l’encodage (...)
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  12. How to Know a City: The Epistemic Value of City Tours.Pilar Lopez-Cantero & Catherine Robb - 2023 - Philosophy of the City Journal 1 (1):31-41.
    When travelling to a new city, we acquire knowledge about its physical terrain, directions, historical facts and aesthetic features. Engaging in tourism practices, such as guided walking tours, provides experiences of a city that are necessarily mediated and partial. This has led scholars in tourism studies, and more recently in philosophy, to question the epistemological value of city tours, critiquingthem as passive, lacking in autonomous agency, and providing misrepresentative experiences of the city. In response, we argue that the mediated and (...)
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  13. The Complexity of Play: A Response to Guyer’s Analysis of Play in Schiller’s Letters on the Aesthetic Education of Man.Kate Brelje - 2021 - In Malcolm MacLean & Wendy Russell (eds.), Play, Philosophy and Performance. New York: Routledge. pp. 142-155.
    In the Letters on the Aesthetic Education of Man (Aesthetic Letters), Friedrich Schiller asserts the importance of play for human beings. He claims, “man only plays when he is in the fullest sense of the word a human being, and he is only fully a human being when he plays” (Schiller, 2005, 131). Play is so pivotal that it qualifies as the activity resonating the state of human fullness. So, naturally, one might ask, what does play consist in for Schiller? (...)
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  14. Beauty and Beautification.Arthur C. Danto - 2000 - In Peg Zeglin Brand (ed.), Beauty Matters. Indiana University Press. pp. 65-83.
    Hegel has identified what I have preemptively designated a third aesthetic realm--in addition to natural beauty and artistic beauty--one greatly connected with human life . . . art applied to the enhancement of life . . . But the other border of what I shall designate the Third Realm is equally non-exclusionary, especially when we consider what Hegel singles out under the head of beautiful people--the kind of beauty possessed by Helen of Troy, say, which we must suppose a wonder (...)
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  15. Kantian and Contextual Beauty.Marcia M. Eaton - 2000 - In Peg Zeglin Brand (ed.), Beauty Matters. Indiana University Press. pp. 27-36.
    To a great extent, Kant more than Tolstoy influenced twentieth-century aesthetics in Eurocentric cultures. Formalist theorists insisted that disinterested apprehension of directly perceivable properties (color, rhythm, meter, balance, proportion, etc.) distinguished aesthetic experiences from all others. Kant never won the day in many non-Eurocentric cultures, however. Native Americans, for example, continued to connect aesthetic activity directly to "interested" and functional objects and events. Decriptions of objects or events as "beautiful" in most African cultures never required distinguishing "What is it for?" (...)
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  16. Foreword: Cutting Two Ways with Beauty.Eleanor Heartney - 2000 - In Peg Zeglin Brand (ed.), Beauty Matters. Indiana University Press.
    Beauty is a contested category today because we both long for and fear its seductions. The essays in this volume interrogate beauty in all its complexity. But whether they construe it as friend or foe, they make it clear that beauty, and our preoccupation with it, cannot be wished away. deeply embedded in that inchoate matter from which our judgments of value are formed, beauty is inseparable from all that is best and worst in human experience.
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  17. Rationality in Indian Philosophy.Arindam Chakrabarti - 1991 - In Eliot Deutsch & Ronald Bontekoe (eds.), A Companion to World Philosophies. Malden, Mass.: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 259–278.
    You cannot say “thank you” in Sanskrit. It would be ridiculous to deduce from this (as William Ward, a British Orientalist) that gratefulness as a sentiment was unknown to the ancient Indian people. It is no less ridiculous to argue that rationality as a concept is absent from or marginal to the entire panoply of classical Indian philosophical traditions on the basis of the fact that there is no exact Sanskrit equivalent of that word.
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  18. Aesthetic Value, Ethos, and Phil Collins.Per F. Broman - 2013-08-26 - In Robert Arp & Kevin S. Decker (eds.), The Ultimate South Park and Philosophy. Wiley. pp. 247–259.
    This chapter talks about the power of music, how characters in South Park use it in telling stories, and how music conveys ideas in the context of Western philosophy. But South Park does raise questions about music that philosophers— particularly Plato—have dealt with again and again. Despite their flaws, these Greek thinkers' views were instrumental to asking questions about music's impact (often referred to as ethos), its mathematical properties in relation to the universe, and how these two aspects interact with (...)
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  19. The Ethical Significance of Kant's Sensus Communis.Brent Kalar - 2017 - Idealistic Studies 47 (1-2):43-58.
    The paper defends an interpretation of Kant’s notion of the sensus communis as the normative ideal of a universal aesthetic community. It further proposes that this understanding is the key to illuminating his account of our moral interest in cultivating taste. A sensus communis is morally necessary because it is an essential means to the creation of the kingdom of ends, which it promotes through its sustaining of a shared symbolic network for the sake of ethical community. The moral advancement (...)
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  20. The Philosophy of Humor: What makes Something Funny.Chris A. Kramer - 2022 - 1000-Word Philosophy: An Introductory Anthology.
    People can laugh at almost anything. What’s the deal with that? What makes something funny? -/- This essay reviews some theories of what it is for something to be funny. Each theory offers insights into this question, but no single approach provides a comprehensive answer.
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  21. Herder: aesthetics against imperialism.John K. Noyes - 2015 - Toronto: University of Toronto Press.
    Among his generation of intellectuals, the eighteenth-century German philosopher Johann Gottfried Herder is recognized both for his innovative philosophy of language and history and for his passionate criticism of racism, colonialism, and imperialism. A student of Immanuel Kant, Herder challenged the idea that anyone--even the philosophers of the Enlightenment--could have a monopoly on truth. In Herder: Aesthetics against Imperialism, John K. Noyes plumbs the connections between Herder's anti-imperialism, often acknowledged but rarely explored in depth, and his epistemological investigations. Noyes argues (...)
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  22. Aesthetics of Universal Knowledge.Pasquale Gagliardi, Simon Schaffer & John Tresch (eds.) - 2017 - Cham: Imprint: Palgrave Macmillan.
    Born out of a major international dialogue held at the Fondazione Giorgio Cini in Venice, Italy, this collection of essays presents innovative and provocative arguments about the claims of universal knowledge schemes and the different aesthetic and material forms in which such claims have been made and executed. Contributors take a close look at everything from religious pilgrimages, museums, and maps of the world, to search engines and automated GPS. Current obsessions in information technology, communications theory, and digital culture often (...)
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  23. Unity and aspect.Andrew Haas - 2018 - Würzburg: Königshausen & Neumann.
    What is first philosophy today? In Unity and Aspect, the questioning begins with a new (old) approach to metaphysics: being is implied; it is implied in everything that is; it is an implication. BUt then, the history of philosophy must be rethought completely - for being implies unity, and time, and the other of time, namely, aspect. THe effect on the self and on self-understanding is radical: we can no longer be thought as human beings; rather, reaching back to the (...)
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  24. The law of increasing the role of subjective factors in the formation of aesthetic attitude to nature.Aminjon Qudratovich Aymatov - unknown
    The functional role and significance of ecological consciousness and culture as the main subjective factor of aesthetic perception of nature is determined by the general intellectual potential of the individual, the ability to express emotional experiences through ideal images, the need to synthesize universal ecological spiritual values. At the individual level. At the same time, a certain commonality of different directions and levels of development of ecoaesthetics ensures the integrity of the subjective factor.
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  25. Why Induction, but not Deduction, is a Legitimate Source of Justified Aesthetic Belief.Edit Karlsson - unknown
    What, if any, kind of inferential reasoning can be a legitimate source of justified aesthetic belief? Looking at deductive and inductive reasoning respectively, this paper concludes that only the latter can be formulated so that there is reason to accept the premises as true and thus justify the conclusion. This follows from considerations about the type of generalisations that the arguments rely on. Universal generalisations, on which the type of deductive reasoning under consideration relies, are always victim to counterexamples. Also, (...)
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  26. Wittgenstein, Aesthetics, and Philosophy.Peter Lewis - 2004 - Routledge.
    Although universally recognised as one of the greatest of modern philosophers, Wittgenstein's work in aesthetics has been unjustly neglected. This is the first book exclusively devoted to Wittgenstein's aesthetics, exploring the themes developed by Wittgenstein in his own writing on aesthetics as well as the implications of Wittgenstein's wider philosophical views for understanding central issues in aesthetics. Drawing together original contributions from leading international scholars, this book will be an important addition to studies of Wittgenstein's thought, but its discussion of (...)
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  27. Murdoch and Kant.Melissa Merritt - 2022 - In Silvia Caprioglio Panizza & Mark Hopwood (eds.), The Murdochian Mind. New York, NY: Routledge. pp. 253-265.
    It has been insufficiently remarked that Murdoch deems “Kant’s ethical theory” to be “one of the most beautiful and exciting things in the whole of philosophy” in her 1959 essay “The Sublime and the Good”. Murdoch specifically has in mind the connection between Kant’s ethics and his theory of the sublime, which runs via the moral feeling of respect (Achtung). The chapter examines Murdoch’s interest in Kant on this point as a way to tease out the range of issues that (...)
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  28. Beauty.Jennifer A. McMahon - 2020 - Oxford Encyclopedia of Literature.
    Literary beauty was once understood as intertwining sensations and ideas, and thus as providing subjective and objective reasons for literary appreciation. However, as theory and philosophy developed, the inevitable claims and counterclaims led to the view that subjective experience was not a reliable guide to literary merit. Literary theory then replaced aesthetics as did philosophy’s focus on literary truth. Along with the demise of the relevance of sensations, literary form also took a back seat. This suggested to some that either (...)
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  29. Artistic Style as the Expression of Ideals.Robert Hopkins & Nick Riggle - 2021 - Philosophers' Imprint 21 (NO. 8):1-18.
    What is artistic style? In the literature one answer to this question has proved influential: the view that artistic style is the expression of personality. In what follows we elaborate upon and evaluatively compare the two most plausible versions of this view with a new proposal—that style is the expression of the artist’s ideals for her art. We proceed by comparing the views’ answers to certain questions we think a theory of individual artistic style should address: Are there limits on (...)
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  30. Symbolism of sacred image: Features and possibilities of formal analysis.Ольга Барановська - 2018 - Докса 1.
    The article is devoted to the analysis of artistic form in visual sacred art at the point of its own pure symbolism which provides the special or exclusive expressiveness of the sacred images and let us identify them exactly as the sacred ones. And this concerns not only aesthetic effects or cultural, spiritual meanings of the sacred images, though it is certainly important, but mainly the way of formation of the universal artistic language that is able to speak about the (...)
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  31. What is Beauty? A Multidisciplinary Approach to Aesthetic Experience.Martino Rossi Monti & Davor Pećnjak (eds.) - 2020 - Cambridge Scholars Publishing.
    From Physical World to Transcendent God(s): Mediatory Functions of Beauty in Plato, Dante and Rupa Gosvami -/- Dragana Jagušić -/- In various philosophical, religious and mystical traditions, beauty is often related to intellectual upliftment and spiritual ascent, which suggests that besides its common aesthetic value it may also acquire an epistemic, metaphysical and spiritual meaning or value. I will examine in detail three accounts in which beauty, at times inseparable from desire and love, mediates between physical, intellectual and spiritual levels (...)
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  32. The Aesthetics of Meaning and Thought: The Bodily Roots of Philosophy, Science, Morality, and Art, Mark Johnson (2018).Ninke Overbeek - 2020 - Empedocles: European Journal for the Philosophy of Communication 11 (1):79-87.
    Review of: The Aesthetics of Meaning and Thought: The Bodily Roots of Philosophy, Science, Morality, and Art, Mark Johnson (2018)Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 304 pp.,ISBN 978-0-22653-894-5, p/bk, USD 30.
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  33. Viscarra, Nietzsche: Las virtudes del genio y la comunicación de la “cultura superior”. Viscarra, Nietzsche. The virtues of genius and the communication of "superior culture".Osman Choque-Aliaga - 2020 - Journal de Comunicación Social 10 (10):147-165.
    Bolivian writer Victor Hugo Viscarra is a constant figure on whom a good number of readers have focused their attention. Review after review of his work has been appearing in the Bolivian press and, in that sense, readers have taken his writings with a blind acceptance omitting in such a way a position that goes beyond the literary frontier. The existence of any work on Viscarra’s role as a thinker, his views on politics, the customs of society itself or the (...)
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  34. The Grace Machine: Of Turns, Wheels and Limbs.Lars Spuybroek - 2018 - Footprint 22 (Summer):7-32.
    Starting with a few simple questions about living well and where movement originates from this essay turns into a vast map of intricate relations revolving around the notion of grace. By developing the argument from a historical perspective it quickly becomes clear that grace relies on the specific qualities of figuration and how the figure appears in what is termed “the gap between habit and inhabitation.” This article is a shorter version of the introductory chapter to my “Grace and Gravity: (...)
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  35. La estética y el arte a debate (II).José Ramón Fabelo-Corzo & Mariana Romero Bello (eds.) - 2018 - Puebla, Pue., México: Colección La Fuente, BUAP.
    El presente libro recopila algunas de las mejores investigaciones presentadas en el “IX Coloquio Internacional de Estética y Arte” en La Habana en diciembre del 2015, redactadas ahora a modo de artículos. La estética y el arte a debate II está compuesto por 27 artículos y se encuentra dividido en cinco bloques que, de alguna manera, reflejan las temáticas centrales alrededor de las cuales giró el encuentro del 2015. Los bloques temáticos son: 1 Arte, estética y política, 2 Cine y (...)
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  36. Kant’s Mathematical Sublime: The Absolutely Great in Aesthetic Estimation.Weijia Wang - 2020 - Kantian Review 25 (3):465-485.
    According to Kant’s Critique of the Power of Judgement, in the end all estimation of magnitude is sensible, or ‘aesthetic’, and the absolutely great in aesthetic estimation is called ‘the mathematical sublime’. This article identifies the relevant sensible element with an inner sensation of a temporal tension: in aesthetic comprehension, the imagination encounters an inevitable tension between the successive reproduction of a magnitude’s individual parts and the simultaneous unification of these parts. The sensation of this tension varies in degree and (...)
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  37. La estética y el arte de regreso a la Academia.José Ramón Fabelo-Corzo & Bertha Laura Álvarez Sánchez (eds.) - 2014 - Puebla, Pue., México: Colección La Fuente, BUAP.
    Los materiales que integran este libro provienen del II Encuentro de Egresados realizado en el verano de 2012 por la Maestría en Estética y Arte de la BUAP. Regresaban a su academia los que alguna vez fueron sus estudiantes. Venían con el propósito de reencontrarse con los avances investigativos de sus profesores y a traer ellos mismos los resultados de la continuidad de su trabajo de investigación. Algunos dejaron también en el encuentro una muestra de su arte. El ciclo de (...)
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  38. Aproximación teórica a la especificidad de los valores estéticos.José Ramón Fabelo Corzo - 2004 - Graffylia 4 (4):17-25.
    El artículo busca acercarse a la comprensión de los rasgos particulares de los valores estéticos, fundamentalmente en las obras de arte. Para ello parte de la premisa de que el valor estético no es en sí mismo un atributo del objeto artístico, ni el resultado exclusivo de la plasmación en él de cierto ideal estético. Para que un objeto sea portador de valor estético ha de funcionar precisamente como tal, lo cual presupone la presencia y participación de otros sujetos que (...)
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  39. A Dream of a Stone: The Ethics of De-anthropocentrism.Tsaiyi Wu - 2020 - Open Philosophy 3 (1):413-428.
    De-anthropocentrism is the leitmotif of philosophy in the twenty-first century, encouraging diverse and competing thoughts as to how this goal may be achieved. This article argues that the method by which we may achieve de-anthropocentrism is ethical rather than metaphysical – it must involve a creation of the self, rather than an interpretation of the given human conditions. Through engagements with the thought of Nietzsche, Levinas, and Foucault, and a close reading of Baudelaire’s poem “La Beauté,” I will illustrate three (...)
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  40. Two Conceptions of Harmony in Ancient Western and Eastern Aesthetics: "Dialectic Harmony" and "Ambiguous Harmony".Tak Lap Yeung & Tak-lap Yeung - 2020 - Journal of East-West Thought 10 (2):65-82.
    In this paper, I argue that the different understandings of “harmony”, which are rooted in ancient Greek and Chinese thought, can be recapitulated in the name of “dialectic harmony” and “ambiguous harmony” regarding the representation of the beautiful. The different understandings of the concept of harmony lead to at least two kinds of aesthetic value as well as ideality – harmony in conciliation and harmony in diversity. Through an explication of the original meaning and relation between the concept of harmony (...)
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  41. Zen Master Dōgen: Philosopher and Poet of Impermanence.Steven Heine - 2016 - In Gereon Kopf (ed.), The Dao Companion to Japanese Buddhist Philosophy. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 381-405.
    Zen master Dōgen 道元, the founder of the Sōtō sect in medieval Japan, is often referred to as the leading classical philosopher in Japanese history and one of the foremost exponents of Mahayana Buddhist thought. His essays, sermons and poems on numerous Buddhist topics included in his main text, the Shōbōgenzō 正法眼蔵, reflect an approach to religious experience based on a more philosophical analysis of topics such as time and temporality, impermanence and momentariness, the universality of Buddha-nature and naturalism, and (...)
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  42. The Retrospective Construction of Derivation as Artistic Behaviour.Emmanuel Mavrommatis - 2018 - Proceedings of the XXIII World Congress of Philosophy 1:193-201.
    The analysis refers to the logical systems of historical evaluation and to the reconstruction of previous or even contemporary artistic works through their reference to “ appraisal through derivation” or to “interpretation of their new meaning through origin” in accordance to the theorem of Philippe Bruneau, Professor of Classical Archaeology, according to which art is identified as that which is derived from art etc. This notion was formulated in 1974 in his prophetic article “Situation méthodologique de l’histoire de l’art antique”,, (...)
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  43. The Individual as System.Shachar Freddy Kislev - 2019 - Idealistic Studies 49 (3):215-234.
    In British Hegelianism we find, forgotten, a weighty theory of individuality. This theory remains one of the most sustained attempts in the history of philosophy to analyze the individual, not in the social or psychological sense, but as a logical-metaphysical category. The Idealist conceptualization of the individual is bound with their unconventional theory of universals, for they argued that any individual is a “concrete universal,” and vice versa. This article reconstructs the British Idealist theory of individuality, highlighting its key insights: (...)
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  44. The Relationship between Sublimity and Morality in Kant's Pre-critical Thought (regarding observations... and remarks...). [REVIEW]Fateme Mehrzad Sadaghiani & Masoud Olia - 2019 - Philosophical Investigations 13 (27):335-352.
    This essay is going to show that the relationship between sublimity and morality in Kant’s precritical thinking doesn’t have a systematic philosophical form. The reason can be sought out in these two things: first, aesthetic feeling and moral feeling haven’t been distinguished clearly and have been defined in terms of each other. Second, morality is grounded in feeling, not pure practical reason and its a priori principle. In Observations on the Feeling of the Beautiful and Sublime, Kant invites human beings (...)
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  45. Reflections of an Existential Crisis in Søren Kierkegaard’s Aesthetic Conception.Antanas Andrijauskas - 2019 - Dialogue and Universalism 29 (2):29-41.
    This article considers the principles of philosophical thinking in Søren Kierkegaard’s nonclassical aesthetics. Special attention is given to his radical critique of “false” and “impersonal” rationalism. This does not only mean the rejection of the traditional principles of classical metaphysics which claims “universality” and “universal meaning.” Kierkegaard also bases his philosophy on individual human life, or, in other words, personal existence with its unique inner world. His critique is more profound than that by Arthur Schopenhauer. Kierkegaard develops his own philosophy (...)
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  46. Directions For A New Aestheticism.Jeffrey Petts - 2005 - Postgraduate Journal of Aesthetics 2 (1):20-31.
    The idea of a new aestheticism is now explicit in both philosophical aesthetics and cultural theory with the publication of Gary Iseminger's The Aesthetic Function of Art and an anthology of essays edited by John Joughin and Simon Malpas critiquing the anti-aestheticism of literary theory. Both are significant in marking a wider trend reacting to, broadly speaking, intellectualised and historicised accounts of art, refocusing on the idea of appreciation itself, and working away from the emphasis on ideology and disregard for (...)
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  47. Severing the Disjuncture between Cultural Studies and Aesthetics: New Ways to Engage Aesthetics in the Study of Social Networking Sites.Hiesun Cecilia Suhr - 2009 - Rhizomes 19 (1).
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