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1 — 50 / 158
  1. Übersetzung und Überlieferung von Philosophie [Translation and Transmission of Philosophy].Ralf Müller, Aurelio Calderon & Xenia Wenzel - forthcoming - Stuttgart, Deutschland: frommann-holzboog.
  2. Tetsugaku Companion to Ueda Shizuteru: Language, Experience, and Zen.Raquel Bouso, Adam Loughnane & Ralf Müller (eds.) - 2022 - Springer.
    This book presents the first collection of essays on the philosophy of Ueda Shizuteru in a Western language. Ueda, the last living member of the Kyoto school, has fostered the East-West dialogue in all his works and has helped to open up the Western image of philosophy by engaging the Zen tradition. The book reflects this particular trait of Ueda’s philosophy, but it also covers all thematic fields of his writings. Contributions from both young and established scholars and experts from (...)
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  3. The Symposium on Overcoming Modernity and Discourse in Wartime Japan.John Krummel - 2021 - Historical Sociology: A Journal of Historical Social Sciences 2021 (2):83-104.
    Abstract: The symposium on overcoming modernity (kindai no chokoku) that took place in Tokyo in 1942 has been much commented upon, but later critics have tended to over-emphasize the wartime political context and the ideological connection to Japanese ultra-nationalism. Closer examination shows that the background and the actual content of the discussion were more complicated. The idea of overcoming modernity had already appeared in debates among Japanese intellectuals before the war, and was always open to different interpretations; it could indicate (...)
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  4. Japan and the West: A Review of Thomas Kasulis’s Engaging Japanese Philosophy: A Short History. [REVIEW]John Krummel - 2021 - The Eastern Buddhist 49:231-247.
  5. Comparative Philosophy in Japan: Nakamura Hajime and Izutsu Toshihiko.John W. M. Krummel - 2019 - In Bret W. Davis (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Japanese Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    This chapter discusses the comparative philosophies of two premier comparativists of postwar Japan, Nakamura Hajime and Izutsu Toshihiko. Both were known as accomplished scholars within their respective fields—Buddhist studies and Indology for Nakamura, and Islamic studies for Izutsu—when they initiated their comparative projects. Each had a distinct vision of what comparison entails and the sort of philosophy it would produce. Nakamura’s project was a world history of ideas that uncovers basic patterns in the unfolding of human thought. Izutsu aims to (...)
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  6. Place and Horizon.John W. M. Krummel - 2019 - In Peter D. Hershock & Roger T. Ames (eds.), Philosophies of Place: An Intercultural Conversation. Honolulu, HI, USA: University of Hawai'i Press. pp. 65-87.
    A chapter in the book, Philosophies of Place: An Intercultural Conversation, edited by Peter D. Hershock and Roger T. Ames, and published by University of Hawaii Press. In this chapter I present a phenomenological ontology of place vis-a-vis horizon and also alterity (otherness), discussing related themes in Heidegger, Kitaro Nishida, Shizuteru Ueda, Otto Bollnow, Karl Jaspers, Ed Casey, Günter Figal, Bernhard Waldenfels, and others. Wherever we are we are implaced, delimited in our being-in-the-world constituted by a horizon that implaces us, (...)
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  7. Philosophy, Manga, and Ōmori Shōzō.Pierre Bonneels & Masahiro M. M. Morioka - 2018 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 3.
    Why would a philosopher choose to convey his ideas in the form of Manga? This discussion between Masahiro Morioka, author of Manga Introduction to Philosophy, and the translator of its French edition, Pierre Bonneels, shows how philosopher and artist Morioka became acquainted, through images, with fundamental abstract notions. After a short historical analysis of the aesthetic advantages of Manga, consideration is given to this unique way of provoking thought. On this basis, theoretical aspects of “time” and the “I” proposed by (...)
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  8. A Zen Philosopher? – Notes on the Philosophical Reading of Dōgen's Shōbōgenzō.Raji C. Steineck - 2018 - In Raji C. Steineck, Elena L. Lange, Ralph Weber & Robert H. Gassmann (eds.), Concepts of Philosophy in Asia and the Islamic World, vol. 1: China and Japan. Boston, USA: Brill. pp. 577-606.
    This contribution argues that it is misleading to consider Dōgen (1200-1253) a philosopher, in spite of a strong reception of his thought in Japanese and Comparative philosophy since the early 20th century. Dōgen himself gives a decidedly parochial description of his own agenda, and that he considered non-Buddhist views and teachings unworthy of any consideration whatsoever. There are substantial differences between Dōgen's concept of the Buddha Way and philosophy as an open-ended and reasoned discourse on matters of fundamental human concern. (...)
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  9. Introduction: ‘What is Japanese Philosophy’?Raji C. Steineck & Elena L. Lange - 2018 - In Raji C. Steineck, Ralph Weber, Robert H. Gassmann & Elena L. Lange (eds.), Concepts of Philosophy in Asia and the Islamic World, vol. 1: China and Japan. Boston, USA: Brill. pp. 459-481.
    This introductory chapter on concepts of Japanese philosophy and the concomitant approaches to this subject contains 1) a brief critical overview of the term's history and its impact on the definition of the field and 2) a short presentation of the ensuing chapters, which create a sustained dialogue on how to understand Japanese philosophy and how to delineate its his history.
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  10. The Self-Awareness of Evil in Pure Land Buddhism: A Translation of Contemporary Kyoto School Philosopher Keta Masako.Melissa Anne-Marie Curley, Jessica L. Main & Melanie Coughlin - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (1):192-201.
    Membership in the Kyoto School of philosophy is defined by both formal and conceptual criteria. Keta Masako 氣多雅子 is a member in good standing in both senses. Formally speaking, she currently occupies the Chair in Religious Studies at Kyoto University.1 This chair, together with the Chair in Philosophy, constitutes the formal nexus of the Kyoto School.2 Keta is the first woman to hold the chair, constellating her in a network that radiates “from the rather substantial circle of students and professors (...)
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  11. An Apology for Philosophical Transgressions.James W. Heisig - 2017 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 2:43-67.
    The essay that follows is, in substance, a lecture delivered in Brussels on 7 December 2016 to the 2nd International Conference of the European Network of Japanese Philosophy. In it I argue that the strategy of qualifying nothingness as an “absolute,” which was adopted by Kyoto School thinkers as a way to come to grips with fundamental problems of Western philosophy, is inherently ambiguous and ultimately weakens the notion of nothingness itself. In its place, a proposal is made to define (...)
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  12. Creative Imagination, Sensus Communis, and the Social Imaginary: Miki Kiyoshi and Nakamura Yūjirō in Dialogue with Contemporary Western Philosophy.John Krummel - 2017 - In Michiko Yusa (ed.), The Bloomsbury Research Handbook of Contemporary Japanese Philosophy. New York, USA: Bloomsbury. pp. 255-284.
    This chapter examines the imagination, its relationship to “common sense,” and its recent development in the notion of the social imaginary in Western philosophy and the contributions Miki Kiyoshi and Nakamura Yūjirō can make in this regard. I trace the historical evolution of the notion of the productive imagination from its seeds in Aristotle through Kant and into the social imagination or imaginary as bearing on our collective being-in-the-world, with semantic and ontological significance, in Paul Ricoeur, Cornelius Castoriadis, and Charles (...)
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  13. Yuasa Yasuo Et le Rapport Corps-Esprit En Pratique. Une Distinction Cartésienne Dans le Miroir du Zen.Andrei Laurentiu - 2017 - In Pierre Bonneels & Jaime Derenne (eds.), Fortune de la philosophie cartésienne au Japon. Classiques Garnier. pp. 133-150.
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  14. Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy: Philosopher la Traduction / Philosophizing Translation.Mayuko Uehara (ed.) - 2017 - Chisokudo Publications.
    For the ninth volume of Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy, titled bilingually in French and English Philosopher la traduction/Philosophizing translation, most of the contributors wrote their articles in foreign languages. By claiming that philosophy has a fundamental “translation-ness”, the editor believes that we can open Japanese philosophy to pluralistic orientations from the perspective of the thematic of “translation,” and in doing so probe into the essential problems of Japanese philosophy. The pieces collected here focus on questions of translation derived from observations (...)
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  15. Shinran as "Other": Revisiting Kurata Haykuzo's The Priest and His Disciples.Michihiro Ama - 2016 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 43 (2):253-274.
  16. La filosofía japonesa en sus textos.Raquel Bouso, James Heisig, Thomas P. Kasulis & John Maraldo (eds.) - 2016 - Barcelona, España: Herder.
  17. A Metaphysical Dialogue Within the Kyōto School of Philosophy. Nishida Kitarō, Sōda Kiichirō, and Mutai Risaku.Michel Dalissier - 2016 - Taiwan Journal of East Asian Studies 13 (2):01-50.
    Nishida Kitarô’s is generally depicted as a philosopher of nothingness. In the present paper, I would like to discuss this suggestive but ambiguous characterization, starting the enquiry with the seminal essay he wrote in order to answer to the critique of his celebrated topological logic, by Sôda Kiichirô. Firstly, I focus on the last sections of Nishida’s essay, to make clear in what sense we can still speak of “being” within the frame of such an unfathomable logic of nothingness. In (...)
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  18. Philosophy on a Bridge.James W. Heisig - 2016 - In . pp. 257-270.
    The author takes a quick look back at his philosophical education and academic interests through the lens of »comparative philosophy« and uncovers a progression of cross-cultural and cross-historical patterns at work, many of them unfolding tacitly beneath the surface. He concludes with a brief listing of five such patterns, culminating in an appeal for a recovery of unified world views shaped within particular traditions but set against the universal backdrop of a common care for the earth.
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  19. 思想史上の柏木義円:その位置づけの前提.Hirofumi Ichikawa - 2016 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 1:31-46.
    In an attempt to place Kashiwagi historically, this article traces the formation of his thinking. Despite having inherited his father’s Shin Buddhist temple, Kashiwagi chose to work as a Christian pastor. Later in life he turned his attention to specifically Christian philosophy, but his early exposure to Buddhism as well as a primary education in Confucianism were decisive in shaping his ideas. In this sense, Kashiwagi represents one prototype of Meiji Japan’s adoption of Christianity: having grown up with the writings (...)
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  20. Modern Zen and Psychoanalysis: The Semantic Connection.Rossa Ó Muireartaigh - 2016 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 1:189-202.
    This paper attempts to locate modern Zen and psychoanalysis in terms of contemporary philosophy of mind, particularly in view of dominant theories of cognitivism that see the mind as informational and material, with meaning being mere information in disguise. Psychoanalysis and modern Zen hold to the contrary view that the mind is “semantic,” not “syntactic,” and that the meanings we have in our heads are not reducible to the physical informational processes from which they have emerged. Meaning, as non-reducible, is (...)
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  21. Um Circunvolver da Noção de Nada.Gabriel Salvi Philipson - 2016 - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 57 (133):233-259.
    RESUMO Este artigo circunscreve a noção de nada absoluto cunhada pela Escola de Kyoto, na intenção de analisar tanto a possibilidade de que exista uma relação intrínseca entre a experiência da linguagem japonesa e essa tentativa contemporânea e historicamente única de realizar um pensamento que conjunte as tradições ocidentais e orientais da filosofia, quanto as diferenças de abordagens filosóficas internas à própria Escola. ABSTRACT The purpose of this article is to circumscribe the notion of absolute nothingness created by Kyoto School. (...)
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  22. The Critique of Nishida Kitarō by Sōda Kiichirō: A Metaphysical Issue.Michel Dalissier - 2015 - Taiwan Journal of East Asian Studies 12 (1):75-110.
    In 1927 Nishida Kitarô wrote a response to the critique of Sôda Kiichirô, represents an unprecedented occasion to rebuild, in a suggestive way, his "topological logic" –– an expression to be discussed in this paper ––, in particular concerning the quirks of a certain kind of metaphysics. More positively, it helps us to cast some light on his understanding of the history of German Philosophy since Kant. Taking this essay as a cornerstone, I would like to take the opportunity to (...)
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  23. Introduction to Nakamura Yūjirō and His Work.John W. M. Krummel - 2015 - Social Imaginaries 1 (1):71-82.
    In Social Imaginaries, vol. 1, nr. 1 (Spring 2015) due out in May 2015.
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  24. "The Logic of Place" and Common Sense.Yūjirō Nakamura & John Krummel - 2015 - Social Imaginaries 1 (1):71-82.
    The essay is a written version of a talk Nakamura Yūjirō gave at the Collège international de philosophie in Paris in 1983. In the talk Nakamura connects the issue of common sense in his own work to that of place in Nishida Kitarō and the creative imagination in Miki Kiyoshi. He presents this connection between the notions of common sense, imagination, and place as constituting one important thread in contemporary Japanese philosophy. He begins by discussing the significance of place (basho) (...)
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  25. ‘The Logic of Place’ and Common Sense.Nakamura Yūjirō & John W. M. Krummel - 2015 - Social Imaginaries 1 (1):83-103.
    The essay is a written version of a talk Nakamura Yūjirō gave at the College international de philosophie in Paris in 1983. In the talk Nakamura connects the issue of common sense in his own work to that of place in Nishida Kitarō and the creative imagination in Miki Kiyoshi. He presents this connection between the notions of common sense, imagination, and place as constituting one important thread in contemporary Japanese philosophy. He begins by discussing the significance of place that (...)
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  26. Japanese Philosophy as a Lens on Greco-European Thought.John C. Maraldo - 2013 - Journal of Japanese Philosophy 1 (1):21-56.
    To answer the question of whether there is such a thing as Japanese philosophy, and what its characteristics might be, scholars have typi­cally used Western philosophy as a measure to examine Japanese texts. This article turns the tables and asks what Western thought looks like from the perspective of Japanese philosophy. It uses Japanese philo­sophical sources as a lens to bring into sharper focus the qualities and biases of Greek-derived Western philosophy. It first examines ques­tions related to the reputed sole (...)
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  27. How a Japanese Philosopher Encountered Bioethics.Masahiro Morioka - 2013 - In Frank Rövekamp & Friederike Bosse (eds.), Ethics in Science and Society: German and Japanese Views. IUDICIUM Verlag. pp. 27-41.
    In this essay I will illustrate how a Japanese philosopher reacted to a newly imported discipline, “bioethics,” in the 1980s and then tried to create an alternative way of looking at “life” in the field of philosophy. This essay might serve as an interesting case study in which a contemporary “western” way of thinking succeeded in capturing, but finally failed to persuade, a then-young Japanese researcher’s mind.
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  28. Gaijin Philosophy and the Problems of Universality and Culture: Conversations with Kasulis, Watsuji, and Sakai.Anton Luis Sevilla - 2013 - In Hakusan Furusato Bungakushô dai 29 kai Akegarasu Haya Shô nyûsen ronbun. pp. 29-58.
    This essay examines how the standpoint of the gaijin (foreigner) shapes and challenges the act of philosophizing, through the experience of overwhelming cultural difference. I examine three challenges the foreigner faces—the need to understand a foreign culture, the need to contribute to a foreign culture, and the need for caution and self-awareness vis-à-vis the excesses and dangers of this attempt. -/- First, through a reading of Thomas Kasulis’ Intimacy or Integrity: Philosophy and Cultural Difference (2002), I take the reader through (...)
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  29. Neglected Themes and Hidden Variations (Review). [REVIEW]John W. M. Krummel - 2012 - Philosophy East and West 62 (2):297-300.
    This is a book review of the book Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy 2: Neglected Themes and Hidden Variations edited by Victor Sōgen Hori and Melissa Anne-Marie Curley, published in 2008 by the Nanzan Institute for Religion and Culture, Nagoya, Japan.
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  30. Action Et Contemplation : Sur Une Lecture Eckhartienne de Shizuteru Ueda.Bouso Raquel - 2012 - Theologiques 20 (1-2):313-339.
    In 1923 Rudolf Otto gathered a number of appendices in Das Heilige (1917) in one of which he connected Zen Buddhism and the medieval mystic Meister Eckhart. The common denominator was life, as it lives without reason, lives because it lives, likewise the righteous man works for the sake of working and only then is genuinely free. When, in 1965 Shizuteru Ueda published his doctoral dissertation on Eckhart, he included a comparison with Zen returning to that topic. In light of (...)
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  31. Nationalism, Political Realism and Democracy in Japan: The Thought of Masao Maruyama.Fumiko Sasaki - 2012 - Routledge.
    Introduction: Masao Maruyama -- Analyzing the causes of the fifteen year war -- Creating modern man: the basis of national security -- Establishing political realism: guidance to national security -- Advocating unarmed neutrality -- Defending democracy: a prerequisite of national security -- Conclusion: predicting the second defeat.
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  32. Japanese Philosophy: A Sourcebook.James W. Heisig, Thomas P. Kasulis & John C. Maraldo - 2011 - University of Hawaiʻi Press.
    This is a set of essays and translations that covers comprehensively all of Japanese philosophy.
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  33. Maruyama Masao to Hiromatsu Wataru: Shisōshi Ni Okeru "Kototeki Sekaikan" No Tenkai.Kenji Yonemura - 2011 - Ochanomizu Shobō.
    丸山眞男の政治思想史と廣松渉の哲学は「現代の人間世界における人間性の運命とは」を「問う」たのであった。今、だからこそ惰性となった現実主義を「醒めた目」で捉える必要がある。つまり、丸山と廣松の両者のよう に「“鉄のように堅い殻”」の歴史内部で退動する「弁証法的緊張」を把握しなくてはならない。二人が生涯を賭けた思想史と哲学の探求は、人間の歴史的現実に対する私たち自身の課題なのである。.
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  34. Review Of: Isomae Jun’Ichi, Japanese Mythology: Hermeneutics on Scripture. [REVIEW]Trent Maxey - 2010 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 37 (2):400-402.
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  35. Maruyama Masao Jinsei No Taiwa.Takeshi Nakano - 2010 - Bungei Shunjū.
    死後十余年を経ても、いまだに熱烈な支持層を誇る政治思想史の巨人・丸山眞男。半世紀にわたって師事した著者ならではの視点で、一代の碩学の真の姿や意外な側面を浮き彫りに。また折に触れ示された言葉の数々を初め て明らかにする。.
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  36. Chinese Buddhism and the Anti-Japan War.Fumihiko Sueki - 2010 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 37 (1):9-20.
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  37. 「おのずから」と「みずから」のあわい:公共する世界を日本思想にさぐる.Seiichi Takeuchi & T'ae-ch'ang Kim (eds.) - 2010 - Tokyo: Tōkyō Daigaku Shuppankai.
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  38. Maruyama Masao: Rinen E No Shin.Atsushi Tōyama - 2010 - Kōdansha.
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  39. Yuasa, Yasuo, Overcoming Modernity: Synchronicity and Image-Thinking, Translated by Shigenori Nagatomo and John Krummel: Albany: SUNY Press, 2008, 247 Pages.Xiaofei Tu - 2010 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (3):371-373.
  40. The Idea of Life-Death: Glimpses From Daoism and Japanese Tradition.MiläInski Maja - 2009 - In Raquel Bouso & James W. Heisig (eds.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy 6: Confluences and Cross-Currents. Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 36-€“54.
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  41. An Alternative Notion of Practice in the Promise of Japanese Philosophy.John Maraldo - 2009 - In Wing Keung Lam & Ching Yuen Cheung (eds.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy 4: Facing the 21st Century. Nagoya: Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 7-21.
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  42. Jung and Hisamatsu Re-Envisioning Religiosity: Jungian Psychotherapy and the Kyoto School.Tokiyuki Nobuhara - 2009 - In G. Derfer, Z. Wang & M. Weber (eds.), The Roar of Awakening. A Whiteheadian Dialogue Between Western Psychotherapies and Eastern Worldviews. Ontos Verlag. pp. 20--157.
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  43. Sengo Shisō Wa Nihon o Yomisokonete Kita: Kin-Gendai Shisōshi Saikō.Sadami Suzuki - 2009 - Heibonsha.
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  44. Maruyama Masao o Yominaosu.Kyūbun Tanaka - 2009 - Kōdansha.
    丸山眞男は西洋近代至上主義者・国民国家至上主義者だったのか。丸山が「主体性」論で追究しようとしていたものは何か。著作、講義録をいま一度丁寧に読みなおし、「他者感覚」「自己内対話」など新たな視点から、誤 解されがちな丸山思想の可能性を探る。.
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  45. Shōwa Shisō Shinron: Nijisseiki Nihon Shisōshi No Kokoromi.Masao Tsuda (ed.) - 2009 - Bunrikaku.
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  46. Iinokoshite Oku Koto.Shunsuke Tsurumi - 2009 - Sakuhinsha.
    善人は弱いんだよ。善人として人に認められたいという考えは、私には全然ない。I AM WRONG.悪人で結構だ!戦前・戦中・戦後の87年間、一貫して「悪人」として日本と対峙してきた哲学者が、自らの思索の道すじを語る。.
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  47. Emptiness and Fundamental Imagination: Nishitani Keiji’s “Emptiness and Immediacy”.Masako Keta - 2008 - In James W. Heisig & Mayuko Uehara (eds.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy: Origins and Possibilities. Nagoya: Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 9-40.
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  48. Recepção e Diálogo: Heidegger e a filosofia japonesa contempor'nea.Antonio Florentino Neto - 2008 - Natureza Humana 10 (1):147-160.
    O pensamento japonês contemporâneo surge e se consolida em diálogo com a tradição filosófica ocidental. Nishida se confronta com os principais problemas da história da filosofia ocidental. Com Tanabe a Escola de Kyoto entra em contato com Heidegger, que se torna o principal interlocutor ocidental de todas as gerações posteriores: Hisamatsu e Nishitani, Ueda e Tsujimura, e por último, Ohashi. As questões filosóficas tratadas por Heidegger, principalmente sua reflexão sobre a linguagem, torna-se um dos principais pontos de partida para o (...)
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  49. Internationalism and Asianism in Japanese Strategic Thought From Meiji to Heisei.Gilbert Rozman - 2008 - Japanese Journal of Political Science 9 (2):209-232.
    Around 1907, 1987, and 2007 Japan faced a crossroads in defining internationalism and Asianism, determining their relative priorities, and assessing their relevance for national identity. Similarities can be found in the far-reaching changes occurring in Japan's external environment in the three periods and in the importance of setting a new direction for strategic thinking. Misjudgments in the first two periods are reviewed in order to draw lessons for responding to today's challenges. A distorted outlook on internationalism led to rejection of (...)
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  50. Martin Heidegger’s Thinking and Japanese Philosophy and From Martin Heidegger’s Reply in Appreciation.Kōichi Tsujimura, Martin Heidegger & Richard Capobianco - 2008 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 12 (2):349-357.
1 — 50 / 158