Results for 'Michael S. Reidy'

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  1.  7
    Michael S. Reidy, Tides of History: Ocean Science and Her Majesty's Navy. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 2008. Pp. Xiv+389. ISBN 978-0-226-70932-1. £55.00. [REVIEW]Katharine Anderson - 2009 - British Journal for the History of Science 42 (3):464.
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  2.  9
    Michael S. Reidy. Tides of History: Ocean Science and Her Majesty's Navy. Xiv + 389 Pp., Figs., Bibl., Index. Chicago/London: University of Chicago Press, 2008. $40. [REVIEW]David Philip Miller - 2009 - Isis 100 (2):429-430.
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  3.  11
    Bernard Lightman;, Michael S. Reidy . The Age of Scientific Naturalism: Tyndall and His Contemporaries. Xv + 256 Pp., Illus., Index. London: Pickering & Chatto, 2014. £60. [REVIEW]Geoffrey Cantor - 2015 - Isis 106 (2):463-464.
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  4.  9
    Darwin's Vertical Thinking: Mountains, Mobility, and the Imagination in 19th‐Century Geology.Michael S. Reidy - 2020 - Centaurus 62 (4):631-646.
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  5.  41
    The Age of Scientific Naturalism: Tyndall and His Contemporaries. By Bernard Lightman and Michael S. Reidy. London: Pickering & Chatto, 2014. 256 Pp. Hardcover $99.00. [REVIEW]James C. Ungureanu - 2015 - Zygon 50 (1):248-251.
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  6.  22
    Circling in on Tyndall and Turner: Bernard Lightman and Michael S. Reidy : The Age of Scientific Naturalism: Tyndall and His Contemporaries. London: Pickering & Chatto, 2014, 256pp, £60, $99 HB. [REVIEW]Katharine Anderson - 2015 - Metascience 24 (2):219-222.
    The subtitle of this work surely deserves a place on its cover. John Tyndall was a Victorian scientist remarkable for his experimental abilities, his wide range of interests in physics and his aggressive personality. He fought his way to a scientific career in London from humble beginnings as a surveyor, railroad engineer and schoolteacher. At his height, from the 1860s to the early 1880s, he juggled several different roles in addition to his principal appointment as professor of natural philosophy at (...)
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  7.  14
    Peter H. Hansen. The Summits of Modern Man: Mountaineering After the Enlightenment. X + 380 Pp., Illus., Index. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2013. $35. [REVIEW]Michael S. Reidy - 2015 - Isis 106 (3):726-727.
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  8.  9
    David N. Livingstone;, Charles W. J. Withers . Geographies of Nineteenth-Century Science. X + 526 Pp., Illus., Tables, Bibl., Index. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2011. $55. [REVIEW]Michael S. Reidy - 2013 - Isis 104 (4):858-858.
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  9.  9
    Jim Endersby. Imperial Nature: Joseph Hooker and the Practices of Victorian Science. 400 Pp., Illus., Bibl., Index. Chicago/London: University of Chicago Press, 2008. $35. [REVIEW]Michael S. Reidy - 2009 - Isis 100 (4):920-921.
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  10.  9
    P. M. Harman. The Culture of Nature in Britain, 1680–1860. Xi + 393 Pp., Illus., Bibl., Index. New Haven, Conn./London: Yale University Press, 2009. $65. [REVIEW]Michael S. Reidy - 2011 - Isis 102 (4):746-748.
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  11.  7
    Sujit Sivasundaram.Nature and the Godly Empire: Science and Evangelical Mission in the Pacific, 1795–1850. Xi + 244 Pp., Figs., Bibl., Index. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2005. $80. [REVIEW]Michael S. Reidy - 2007 - Isis 98 (3):655-656.
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  12.  5
    Communicating Science: The Scientific Article From the 17th Century to the Present.Alan G. Gross, Joseph E. Harmon & Michael S. Reidy - 2002 - Oxford University Press USA.
    This book describes the development of the scientific article from its modest beginnings to the global phenomenon that it has become today. The authors focus on changes in the style, organization, and argumentative structure of scientific communication over time. This outstanding resource is the definitive study on the rhetoric of science.
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  13. Causation and Responsibility*: MICHAEL S. MOORE.Michael S. Moore - 1999 - Social Philosophy and Policy 16 (2):1-51.
    In various areas of Anglo-American law, legal liability turns on causation. In torts and contracts, we are each liable only for those harms we have caused by the actions that breach our legal duties. Such doctrines explicitly make causation an element of liability. In criminal law, sometimes the causal element for liability is equally explicit, as when a statute makes punishable any act that has “ caused … abuse to the child….” More often, the causal element in criminal liability is (...)
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  14. Choice, Character, and Excuse*: MICHAEL S. MOORE.Michael S. Moore - 1990 - Social Philosophy and Policy 7 (2):29-58.
    Freud justified his extensive theorizing about dreams by the observation that they were “the royal road” to something much more general: namely, our unconscious mental life. The current preoccupation with the theory of excuse in criminal law scholarship can be given a similar justification, for the excuses are the royal road to theories of responsibility generally. The thought is that if we understand why we excuse in certain situations but not others, we will have also gained a much more general (...)
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  15.  39
    The Gettier Problem and Legal Proof: Michael S. Pardo.Michael S. Pardo - 2010 - Legal Theory 16 (1):37-57.
    This article explores the relationships between legal proof and fundamental epistemic concepts such as knowledge and justification. A survey of the legal literature reveals a confusing array of seemingly inconsistent proposals and presuppositions regarding these relationships. This article makes two contributions. First, it reconciles a number of apparent inconsistencies and tensions in accounts of the epistemology of legal proof. Second, it argues that there is a deeper connection between knowledge and legal proof than is typically argued for or presupposed in (...)
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  16.  53
    The Destruction of the World Trade Center and the Law on Event-Identity: Michael S. Moore.Michael S. Moore - 2004 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 55:259-342.
    September 11, 2001 brought to legal awareness an issue that has long puzzled metaphysicians. The general issue is that of event-identity, drawing the boundaries of events so that we can tell when there is one event and when there are two. The September 11th version of that issue is: how many occurrences of insured events were there on September 11, 2001 in New York? Was the collapse of the two World Trade Center Towers one event, despite the two separate airliners (...)
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  17.  54
    John Martin Fischer's The Metaphysics of Free Will: An Essay on Control: Michael S. McKenna.Michael S. McKenna - 1997 - Legal Theory 3 (4):379-397.
    John Martin Fischer's The Metaphysics of Free Will is devoted to two major projects. First, Fischer defends the thesis that determinism is incompatible with a person's control over alternatives to the actual future. Second, Fischer defends the striking thesis that such control is not necessary for moral responsibility. This review essay examines Fischer's arguments for each thesis. Fischer's defense of the incompatibilist thesis is the most innovative to date, and I argue that his formulation restructures the free will debate. To (...)
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  18.  46
    Reasons and Rational Motivational Access.Michael S. Brady - 1998 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 79 (2):99–114.
  19.  6
    Valencia, 1990.Michael S. Yesley - 1991 - Hastings Center Report 21 (2):3-4.
  20.  64
    Suffering and Virtue.Michael S. Brady - 2018 - Oxford University Press.
    Suffering, in one form or another, is present in all of our lives. But why do we suffer? On one reading, this is a question about the causes of physical and emotional suffering. But on another, it is a question about whether suffering has a point or purpose or value. In this ground-breaking book, Michael Brady argues that suffering is vital for the development of virtue, and hence for us to live happy or flourishing lives. After presenting a distinctive (...)
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  21. Causation and Responsibility: An Essay in Law, Morals, and Metaphysics.Michael S. Moore - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    The concept of causation is fundamental to ascribing moral and legal responsibility for events. Yet the precise relationship between causation and responsibility remains unclear. This book clarifies that relationship through an analysis of the best accounts of causation in metaphysics, and a critique of the confusion in legal doctrine.
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  22.  11
    Relating Neuroscience to Responsibility: Comments on Hirstein, Sifferd, and Fagan’s Responsible Brains.Michael S. Moore - 2022 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 16 (2):283-298.
    The article explores the agreements and disagreements between the author and the authors of Responsible Brains on how neuroscience relates to moral responsibility. The agreements are fundamental: neuroscience is not the harbinger of revolutionary revision of our views of when persons are morally responsible for the harms that they cause. The disagreements are in the details of what is needed for neuroscience to be the helper of the moral sciences.
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  23.  4
    Causation and Responsibility: An Essay in Law, Morals, and Metaphysics.Michael S. Moore - 2008 - Oxford University Press UK.
    The concept of causation is fundamental to ascribing moral and legal responsibility for events. Yet the precise relationship between causation and responsibility remains unclear. This book clarifies that relationship through an analysis of the best accounts of causation in metaphysics, and a critique of the confusion in legal doctrine. The result is a powerful argument in favour of reforming the moral and legal understanding of how and why we attribute responsibility to agents.
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  24. Placing Blame: A Theory of the Criminal Law.Michael S. Moore - 1997 - Oxford University Press.
    Originally published: Oxford: Clarendon, 1997.
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  25.  32
    The End of History and the Last Man.Michael S. Roth & Francis Fukuyama - 1993 - History and Theory 32 (2):188.
  26. R. S. Peters' Normative Conception of Education and Educational Aims.Michael S. Katz - 2009 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 43 (s1):97-108.
    This article aims to highlight why R. S. Peters' conceptual analysis of ‘education’ was such an important contribution to the normative field of philosophy of education. In the article, I do the following: 1) explicate Peters' conception of philosophy of education as a field of philosophy and explain his approach to the philosophical analysis of concepts; 2) emphasize several (normative) features of Peters' conception of education, while pointing to a couple of oversights; and 3) suggest how Peters' analysis might be (...)
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  27. The Cognitive Neurosciences.Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.) - 1995 - MIT Press.
  28. The Irrationality of Recalcitrant Emotions.Michael S. Brady - 2009 - Philosophical Studies 145 (3):413 - 430.
    A recalcitrant emotion is one which conflicts with evaluative judgement. (A standard example is where someone is afraid of flying despite believing that it poses little or no danger.) The phenomenon of emotional recalcitrance raises an important problem for theories of emotion, namely to explain the sense in which recalcitrant emotions involve rational conflict. In this paper I argue that existing ‘neojudgementalist’ accounts of emotions fail to provide plausible explanations of the irrationality of recalcitrant emotions, and develop and defend my (...)
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  29.  86
    Moore’s Truths About Causation and Responsibility: A Reply to Alexander and Ferzan. [REVIEW]Michael S. Moore - 2012 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 6 (3):445-462.
    In this response to the review of Moore, Causation and Responsibility, by Larry Alexander and Kimberly Ferzan, previously published in this journal, two issues are discussed. The first is whether causation, counterfactual dependence, moral blame, and culpability, are all scalar properties or relations, that is, matters of more-or-less rather than either-or. The second issue discussed is whether deontological moral obligation is best described as a prohibition against using another as a means, or rather, as a prohibition on an agent strongly (...)
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  30.  17
    The Epistemic Life of Groups: Essays in the Epistemology of Collectives.Michael S. Brady & Miranda Fricker (eds.) - 2016 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Groups engage in epistemic activity all the time--whether it be the active collective inquiry of scientific research groups or crime detection units, or the evidential deliberations of tribunals and juries, or the informational efforts of the voting population in general--and yet in philosophy there is still relatively little epistemology of groups to help explore these epistemic practices and their various dimensions of social and philosophical significance. The aim of this book is to address this lack, by presenting original essays in (...)
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  31.  11
    Placing Blame a General Theory of the Criminal Law.Michael S. Moore - 1997 - Oxford University Press, Usa.
    Originally published: Oxford: Clarendon, 1997.
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  32. Painfulness, Desire, and the Euthyphro Dilemma.Michael S. Brady - 2018 - American Philosophical Quarterly 55 (3):239-250.
    The traditional desire view of painfulness maintains that pain sensations are painful because the subject desires that they not be occurring. A significant criticism of this view is that it apparently succumbs to a version of the Euthyphro Dilemma: the desire view, it is argued, is committed to an implausible answer to the question of why pain sensations are painful. In this paper, I explain and defend a new desire view, and one which can avoid the Euthyphro Dilemma. This new (...)
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  33. Mill's Moral Theory and the Problem of Preference Change.Michael S. McPherson - 1982 - Ethics 92 (2):252-273.
    A reconsideration of mill's theory of "higher pleasures," construed as a way of evaluating changes in preferences or character that result from changes in social environment. mill's account is criticized and partly reconstructed in light of modern preference theory, but viewed favorably as an illuminating attempt to address a fundamental problem in moral evaluation of social institutions. mill's advocacy of the higher pleasures is defended in particular against the charge that it is incompatible with his commitment to liberty.
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  34. Curiosity and the Value of Truth.Michael S. Brady - 2009 - In Adrian Haddock, Alan Millar & Duncan Pritchard (eds.), Epistemic Value. Oxford University Press. pp. 265-284.
    This chapter focuses on the question of whether true belief can have final value because it answers our ‘intellectual interest’ or ‘natural curiosity’. The idea is that sometimes we are interested in the truth on some issue not for any ulterior purpose, but simply because we are curious about that issue. It is argued that this approach fails to provide an adequate explanation of the final value of true belief, since there is an unbridgeable gap between our valuing the truth (...)
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  35.  58
    Safety Vs. Sensitivity: Possible Worlds and the Law of Evidence.Michael S. Pardo - 2018 - Legal Theory 24 (1):50-75.
    ABSTRACTThis article defends the importance of epistemic safety for legal evidence. Drawing on discussions of sensitivity and safety in epistemology, the article explores how similar considerations apply to legal proof. In the legal context, sensitivity concerns whether a factual finding would be made if it were false, and safety concerns how easily a factual finding could be false. The article critiques recent claims about the importance of sensitivity for the law of evidence. In particular, this critique argues that sensitivity does (...)
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  36.  30
    Toward a Theory of Human Memory: Data Structures and Access Processes.Michael S. Humphreys, Janet Wiles & Simon Dennis - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (4):655-667.
    Starting from Marr's ideas about levels of explanation, a theory of the data structures and access processes in human memory is demonstrated on 10 tasks. Functional characteristics of human memory are captured implementation-independently. Our theory generates a multidimensional task classification subsuming existing classifications such as the distinction between tasks that are implicit versus explicit, data driven versus conceptually driven, and simple associative versus higher order, providing a broad basis for new experiments. The formal language clarifies the binding problem in episodic (...)
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  37.  8
    Different Ways to Cue a Coherent Memory System: A Theory for Episodic, Semantic, and Procedural Tasks.Michael S. Humphreys, John D. Bain & Ray Pike - 1989 - Psychological Review 96 (2):208-233.
  38. Virtue, Emotion and Attention.Michael S. Brady - 2010 - Metaphilosophy 41 (1-2):115-131.
    The perceptual model of emotions maintains that emotions involve, or are at least analogous to, perceptions of value. On this account, emotions purport to tell us about the evaluative realm, in much the same way that sensory perceptions inform us about the sensible world. An important development of this position, prominent in recent work by Peter Goldie amongst others, concerns the essential role that virtuous habits of attention play in enabling us to gain perceptual and evaluative knowledge. I think that (...)
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  39. Consciousness and the Cerebral Hemispheres.Michael S. Gazzaniga - 1995 - In The Cognitive Neurosciences. MIT Press.
  40.  37
    The Attention Schema Theory: A Mechanistic Account of Subjective Awareness.Michael S. A. Graziano & Taylor W. Webb - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  41.  14
    Greater Advaita Vedānta: The Case of Niścaldās.Michael S. Allen - 2017 - International Journal of Hindu Studies 21 (3):275-297.
    To understand the history of Advaita Vedānta and its rise to prominence, we need to devote more attention to what might be termed “Greater Advaita Vedānta,” or Advaita Vedānta as expressed outside the standard canon of Sanskrit philosophical works. Elsewhere I have examined the works of Niścaldās, whose Hindi-language Vicār-sāgar was once referred to by Swami Vivekananda as the most influential book of its day. In this paper, I look back to one of Niścaldās’s major influences: Sundardās, a well-known Hindi (...)
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  42. Eschatology and the Technological Future.Michael S. Burdett - 2014 - Routledge.
    The rapid advancement of technology has led to an explosion of speculative theories about what the future of humankind may look like. These "technological futurisms" have arisen from significant advances in the fields of nanotechnology, biotechnology and information technology and are drawing growing scrutiny from the philosophical and theological communities. This text seeks to contextualize the growing literature on the cultural, philosophical and religious implications of technological growth by considering technological futurisms such as transhumanism in the context of the long (...)
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  43.  21
    What's in a Name?: Bioethics -- And Human Rights -- At UNESCO.Michael S. Yesley - 2005 - Hastings Center Report 35 (2):8-8.
  44.  16
    Libet's Challenge (s) to Responsible Agency.Michael S. Moore - 2010 - In Walter Sinnott-Armstrong & Lynn Nadel (eds.), Conscious Will and Responsibility: A Tribute to Benjamin Libet. Oup Usa. pp. 207.
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  45.  6
    Should Educators Accommodate Intolerance? Homosexuality and the Islamic Case.Michael S. Merry - 2005 - Journal of Moral Education 34 (1):19-36.
    The ideological interface between Muslims and liberal educators undoubtedly is strained in the realm of sex education, and perhaps on no topic more so than homosexuality. Some argue that schools should not try to ‘undermine the faith’ of Muslims, who object to teaching homosexuality as an ‘acceptable alternative lifestyle’. In this article, I will argue against this monolithic presentation of Islam. Furthermore, I will argue that a narrow view of Islam is neglectful of gay and lesbian Muslims who are particularly (...)
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  46.  51
    A Bird's Eye View: Biological Categorization and Reasoning Within and Across Cultures.Jeremy N. Bailenson, Michael S. Shum, Scott Atran, Douglas L. Medin & John D. Coley - 2002 - Cognition 84 (1):1-53.
    Many psychological studies of categorization and reasoning use undergraduates to make claims about human conceptualization. Generalizability of findings to other populations is often assumed but rarely tested. Even when comparative studies are conducted, it may be challenging to interpret differences. As a partial remedy, in the present studies we adopt a 'triangulation strategy' to evaluate the ways expertise and culturally different belief systems can lead to different ways of conceptualizing the biological world. We use three groups (US bird experts, US (...)
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  47.  64
    Michael S. Moore: Mechanical Choices. The Responsibility of the Human Machine: New York: Oxford University Press, 2020. E-book (ISBN 9780190864019). 589 pages.1 hardback (ISBN: 9780190863999) 64 £. 616 pages. [REVIEW]Sofia M. I. Jeppsson - 2022 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 25 (3):499-502.
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  48.  10
    Anisotropic 3D Inversion of Towed-Streamer Electromagnetic Data: Case Study From the Troll West Oil Province.Michael S. Zhdanov, Masashi Endo, Daeung Yoon, Martin Čuma, Johan Mattsson & Jonathan Midgley - 2014 - Interpretation: SEG 2 (3):SH97-SH113.
    One of the critical problems in the interpretation of marine controlled-source electromagnetic geophysical data is taking into account the anisotropy of the rock formations. We evaluated a 3D anisotropic inversion method based on the integral equation method. We applied this method to the full 3D anisotropic inversion of towed-streamer electromagnetic data. The towed-streamer EM system makes it possible to collect EM data with a high production rate and over very large survey areas. At the same time, 3D inversion of towed-streamer (...)
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  49. Act and Crime: The Philosophy of Action and its Implications for Criminal Law.Michael S. Moore - 1993 - Oxford University Press.
    This work provides, for the first time, a unified account of the theory of action presupposed by both British and American criminal law and its underlying morality. It defends the view that human actions are volitionally caused body movements. This theory illuminates three major problems in drafting and implementing criminal law--what the voluntary act requirement does and should require, what complex descriptions of actions prohibited by criminal codes both do and should require, and when the two actions are the "same" (...)
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  50. Punishing the Awkward, the Stupid, the Weak, and the Selfish: The Culpability of Negligence.Michael S. Moore & Heidi M. Hurd - 2011 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 5 (2):147-198.
    Negligence is a problematic basis for being morally blamed and punished for having caused some harm, because in such cases there is no choice to cause or allow—or risk causing or allowing—such harm to occur. The standard theories as to why inadvertent risk creation can be blameworthy despite the lack of culpable choice are that in such cases there is blame for: (1) an unexercised capacity to have adverted to the risk; (2) a defect in character explaining why one did (...)
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