Results for 'Justin B. Shaddock'

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  1. Kant and the Most Difficult Thing That Could Ever Be Undertaken on Behalf of Metaphysics.Justin B. Shaddock - 2014 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 31 (1).
    Kant calls his Transcendental Deduction "the most difficult thing that could ever be undertaken on behalf of metaphysics" (4:260). Readers have found it not just difficult but downright impossible. I will address two long-standing problems. First, Kant seems to contradict his conclusion at the outset of his proof. He does so in both the 1781 and 1787 editions of his Critique of Pure Reason. Second, Kant seems to argue for his single conclusion twice over in his Critique's 1787 edition. I (...)
     
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  2.  78
    Kant's Conceptualism: A New Reading of the Transcendental Deduction.Justin B. Shaddock - 2018 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 99 (3):464-488.
    I defend a novel interpretation of Kant's conceptualism regarding the contents of our perceptual experiences. Conceptualist interpreters agree that Kant's Deduction aims to prove that intuitions require the categories for their spatiality and temporality. But conceptualists disagree as to which features of space and time make intuitions require the categories. Interpreters have cited the singularity, unity, infinity, and homogeneity of space and time. But this is incompatible with Kant's Aesthetic, which aims to prove that these same features qualify space and (...)
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  3.  68
    Kant’s Neglected Alternative and the Unavoidable Need for the Transcendental Deduction.Justin B. Shaddock - 2019 - Kantian Review 24 (1):127-152.
    The problem of Kant’s Neglected Alternative is that while his Aesthetic provides an argument that space and time are empirically real – in applying to all appearances – its argument seems to fall short of the conclusion that space and time are transcendentally ideal, in not applying to any things in themselves. By considering an overlooked passage in which Kant explains why his Transcendental Deduction is ‘unavoidably necessary’, I argue that it is not solely in his Aesthetic but more so (...)
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  4. Kant’s Transcendental Idealism and His Transcendental Deduction.Justin B. Shaddock - 2015 - Kantian Review 20 (2):265-288.
    I argue for a novel, non-subjectivist interpretation of Kant’s transcendental idealism. Kant’s idealism is often interpreted as specifying how we must experience objects or how objects must appear to us. I argue to the contrary by appealing to Kant’s Transcendental Deduction. Kant’s Deduction is the proof that the categories are not merely subjectively necessary conditions we need for our cognition, but objectively valid conditions necessary for objects to be appearances. My interpretation centres on two claims. First, Kant’s method of self-knowledge (...)
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  5.  62
    Recent Work on Kant's Transcendental Deduction.Justin B. Shaddock - 2017 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 25 (2):401-410.
  6.  62
    Why is Kant’s Transcendental Deduction So Difficult?Justin B. Shaddock - 2013 - Southwest Philosophy Review 29 (1):155-162.
  7.  79
    Justification, Objectivity, and Subjectivity in Kant’s Transcendental Deduction of the Categories.Justin B. Shaddock - 2012 - Southwest Philosophy Review 28 (1):177-185.
  8.  20
    Thomas C. Vinci, Space, Geometry, and Kant’s Transcendental Deduction of the Categories Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014 Pp. Xii + 251 ISBN 9780199381166 $74.00. [REVIEW]Justin B. Shaddock - 2015 - Kantian Review 20 (3):501-506.
  9. Climate Skepticism and the Manufacture of Doubt: Can Dissent in Science Be Epistemically Detrimental?Justin B. Biddle & Anna Leuschner - 2015 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 5 (3):261-278.
    The aim of this paper is to address the neglected but important problem of differentiating between epistemically beneficial and epistemically detrimental dissent. By “dissent,” we refer to the act of objecting to a particular conclusion, especially one that is widely held. While dissent in science can clearly be beneficial, there might be some instances of dissent that not only fail to contribute to scientific progress, but actually impede it. Potential examples of this include the tobacco industry’s funding of studies that (...)
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  10. On Predicting Recidivism: Epistemic Risk, Tradeoffs, and Values in Machine Learning.Justin B. Biddle - forthcoming - Canadian Journal of Philosophy:1-21.
    Recent scholarship in philosophy of science and technology has shown that scientific and technological decision making are laden with values, including values of a social, political, and/or ethical character. This paper examines the role of value judgments in the design of machine-learning systems generally and in recidivism-prediction algorithms specifically. Drawing on work on inductive and epistemic risk, the paper argues that ML systems are value laden in ways similar to human decision making, because the development and design of ML systems (...)
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  11.  94
    Inductive Risk, Epistemic Risk, and Overdiagnosis of Disease.Justin B. Biddle - 2016 - Perspectives on Science 24 (2):192-205.
    Philosophers interested in the role of values in science have focused much attention on the argument from inductive risk. In the 1950s and 1960s, a number of authors argued that value judgments play an ineliminable role in the acceptance or rejection of hypotheses. No hypothesis is ever verified with certainty, and so a decision to accept or reject a hypothesis depends upon whether the evidence is sufficiently strong. But whether the evidence is sufficiently strong depends upon the consequences of making (...)
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  12. Epistemic Corruption and Manufactured Doubt: The Case of Climate Science.Justin B. Biddle, Anna Leuschner & Ian James Kidd - 2017 - Public Affairs Quarterly 31 (3):165-187.
    Criticism plays an essential role in the growth of scientific knowledge. In some cases, however, criticism can have detrimental effects; for example, it can be used to ‘manufacture doubt’ for the purpose of impeding public policy making on issues such as tobacco consumption and greenhouse gas emissions (e.g., Oreskes & Conway 2010). In this paper, we build on previous work by Biddle and Leuschner (2015) who argue that criticism that meets certain conditions can be epistemically detrimental. We extend and refine (...)
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  13.  69
    “Antiscience Zealotry”? Values, Epistemic Risk, and the GMO Debate.Justin B. Biddle - 2018 - Philosophy of Science 85 (3):360-379.
    This article argues that the controversy over genetically modified crops is best understood not in terms of the supposed bias, dishonesty, irrationality, or ignorance on the part of proponents or critics, but rather in terms of differences in values. To do this, the article draws on and extends recent work of the role of values and interests in science, focusing particularly on inductive risk and epistemic risk, and it shows how the GMO debate can help to further our understanding of (...)
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  14.  54
    Can Patents Prohibit Research? On the Social Epistemology of Patenting and Licensing in Science.Justin B. Biddle - 2014 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 45:14-23.
    A topic of growing importance within philosophy of science is the epistemic implications of the organization of research. This paper identifies a promising approach to social epistemology—nonideal systems design—and uses it to examine one important aspect of the organization of research, namely the system of patenting and licensing and its role in structuring the production and dissemination of knowledge. The primary justification of patenting in science and technology is consequentialist in nature. Patenting should incentivize research and thereby promote the development (...)
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  15.  23
    Epistemic Risks in Cancer Screening: Implications for Ethics and Policy.Justin B. Biddle - 2020 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 79:101200.
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  16.  13
    Exploring Antecedents and Consequences of Managerial Moral Stress.Justin B. Ames, James Gaskin & Bradley D. Goronson - 2020 - Business Ethics: A European Review 29 (3):557-569.
    Business Ethics: A European Review, EarlyView.
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  17.  26
    Tragedy of the Anticommons? Intellectual Property and the Sharing of Scientific Information.Justin B. Biddle - 2012 - Philosophy of Science 79 (5):821-832.
    Many philosophers argue that the emphasis on commercializing scientific research---and particularly on patenting the results of research---is both epistemically and socially detrimental, in part because it inhibits the flow of information. One of the most important of these criticisms is the ``tragedy of the anticommons'' thesis. Some have attempted to test this thesis empirically, and many have argued that these empirical tests effectively falsify the thesis. I argue that they neither falsify nor disconfirm the thesis because they do not actually (...)
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  18.  46
    Advocates or Unencumbered Selves? On the Role of Mill’s Political Liberalism in Longino’s Contextual Empiricism.Justin B. Biddle - 2009 - Philosophy of Science 76 (5):612-623.
    Helen Longino’s “contextual empiricism” is one of the most sophisticated recent attempts to defend a social theory of science. On this view, objectivity and epistemic acceptability require that research be produced within communities that approximate a Millian marketplace of ideas. I argue, however, that Longino’s embedding of her epistemology within the framework of Mill’s political liberalism implies a conception of individual epistemic agents that is incompatible with her view that scientific knowledge is necessarily social, and I begin to articulate an (...)
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  19.  15
    Intellectual Property Rights and Global Climate Change: Toward Resolving an Apparent Dilemma.Justin B. Biddle - 2016 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (3):301-319.
    This paper addresses an apparent dilemma that must be resolved in order to respond ethically to global climate change. The dilemma can be presented as follows. Responding ethically to global climate change requires technological innovation that is accessible to everyone, including inhabitants of the least developed countries. Technological innovation, according to many, requires strong intellectual property protection, but strong intellectual property protection makes it highly unlikely that patent-protected technologies will be accessible to developing countries at affordable prices. Given this, responding (...)
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  20.  32
    Deadly Medicines and Organised Crime: How Big Pharma has Corrupted Healthcare by Peter Gøtzsche.Justin B. Biddle - 2016 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 26 (2):40-43.
    From the title, Deadly Medicines and Organised Crime: How Big Pharma has Corrupted Healthcare, Peter Gøtzsche makes the thesis of his book very clear. Not only does the pharmaceutical industry contribute to detrimental health outcomes through biased research, deceptive marketing, and disease mongering, but the industry’s business model meets the criteria of an organized criminal operation. Gøtzsche argues for this in two parts. First, he defines organized crime by drawing upon the United States Organized Crime Control Act of 1970, the (...)
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  21.  1
    The Earliest Discoveries of Dinosaurs.Justin B. Delair - 1975 - Isis 66 (1):5-25.
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  22.  34
    Investigating the Subjective Reports of Rejection Processes in the Word Frequency Mirror Effect.J. Thadeus Meeks, Justin B. Knight, Gene A. Brewer, Gabriel I. Cook & Richard L. Marsh - 2014 - Consciousness and Cognition 24:57-69.
  23.  14
    Kant on Inclination and Reason.Justin Shaddock - forthcoming - Southern Journal of Philosophy.
    The Southern Journal of Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  24.  3
    Evidence of Validity for a Newly Developed Digital Cognitive Test Battery.Stefan Vermeent, Ron Dotsch, Ben Schmand, Laura Klaming, Justin B. Miller & Gijs van Elswijk - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  25.  6
    Kant on Inclination and Reason.Justin Shaddock - forthcoming - Wiley: The Southern Journal of Philosophy.
    The Southern Journal of Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  26.  9
    Mere Subjectivism? Kant’s Deduction and the Hegelian Criticism.Justin Shaddock & Anhui Huang - 2021 - In Camilla Serck-Hanssen & Beatrix Himmelmann (eds.), The Court of Reason: Proceedings of the 13th International Kant Congress. De Gruyter. pp. 651-658.
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  27.  96
    From Sensory Processes to Conscious Perception.Justin S. Feinstein, Murray B. Stein, Gabriel N. Castillo & Martin P. Paulus - 2004 - Consciousness and Cognition 13 (2):323-335.
    In recent years, cognitive neuroscientists have began to explore the process of how sensory information gains access to awareness. To further probe this process, event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging was used while testing subjects with a paradigm known as the “attentional blink.” In this paradigm, visually presented information sporadically fails to reach awareness. It was found that the magnitude and time course of activation within the anterior cingulate , medial prefrontal cortex , and frontopolar cortex predicted whether or not information (...)
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  28.  14
    The Automaticity of Visual Statistical Learning.Nicholas B. Turk-Browne, Justin A. Jungé & Brian J. Scholl - 2005 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 134 (4):552-564.
  29. Moral Grandstanding in Public Discourse: Status-Seeking Motives as a Potential Explanatory Mechanism in Predicting Conflict.Joshua B. Grubbs, Brandon Warmke, Justin Tosi, A. Shanti James & W. Keith Campbell - 2019 - PLoS ONE 14 (10).
    Public discourse is often caustic and conflict-filled. This trend seems to be particularly evident when the content of such discourse is around moral issues (broadly defined) and when the discourse occurs on social media. Several explanatory mechanisms for such conflict have been explored in recent psychological and social-science literatures. The present work sought to examine a potentially novel explanatory mechanism defined in philosophical literature: Moral Grandstanding. According to philosophical accounts, Moral Grandstanding is the use of moral talk to seek social (...)
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  30. Moral Grandstanding and Political Polarization: A Multi-Study Consideration.Joshua B. Grubbs, Brandon Warmke, Justin Tosi & A. Shanti James - 2020 - Journal of Research in Personality 88.
    The present work posits that social motives, particularly status seeking in the form of moral grandstanding, are likely at least partially to blame for elevated levels of affective polarization and ideological extremism in the U.S. In Study 1, results from both undergraduates (N = 981; Mean age = 19.4; SD = 2.1; 69.7% women) and a cross-section of U.S. adults matched to 2010 census norms (N = 1,063; Mean age = 48.20, SD = 16.38; 49.8% women) indicated that prestige-motived grandstanding (...)
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  31.  33
    Are Thoughtful People More Utilitarian? CRT as a Unique Predictor of Moral Minimalism in the Dilemmatic Context.Edward B. Royzman, Justin F. Landy & Robert F. Leeman - 2015 - Cognitive Science 39 (2):325-352.
    Recent theorizing about the cognitive underpinnings of dilemmatic moral judgment has equated slow, deliberative thinking with the utilitarian disposition and fast, automatic thinking with the deontological disposition. However, evidence for the reflective utilitarian hypothesis—the hypothesized link between utilitarian judgment and individual differences in the capacity for rational reflection has been inconsistent and difficult to interpret in light of several design flaws. In two studies aimed at addressing some of the flaws, we found robust evidence for a reflective minimalist hypothesis—high CRT (...)
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  32.  50
    Emotion and Object.Justin C. B. Gosling - 1965 - Philosophical Review 74 (October):486-503.
  33. Where We Find Ourselves.Justin Kimball & Richard B. Woodward - 2006 - Center for American Places.
    Clambering down slippery rocks to a swimming hole. Ducking the plume of smoke from a barbecue grill. Wishing for a breeze in a too-small dome tent. Scanning the sky for rain from a postage-stamp backyard. It is in these small moments of action—and inaction—that Justin Kimball captures our everyday attempts to relax. Indeed, one might argue that the events depicted are everyday life. Kimball’s compelling photographs depict ordinary people—parents and teens, grandparents and kids—in landscapes of leisure. These are not (...)
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  34.  49
    Mental Causes and Fear.Justin C. B. Gosling - 1962 - Mind 71 (July):289-306.
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  35.  25
    Establishing How Natural Environmental Competency, Organizational Social Consciousness, and Innovativeness Relate.Clay Dibrell, Justin B. Craig, Jaemin Kim & Aaron J. Johnson - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 127 (3):591-605.
    This article investigates the moderating effects of organizational social consciousness on the natural environmental competency and innovativeness relationship. Organizational social consciousness reflects the organization’s awareness of its place and contribution to the larger system in which it exists and is developed through an organization’s social responsibility, ethics, culture, corporate values, and the view of its stakeholders. Through our study of key strategic decision makers from organizations located in the USA, we operationalize organizational social consciousness and demonstrate the efficacy of this (...)
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  36.  62
    Moral Grandstanding, Narcissism, and Self-Reported Responses to the COVID-19 Crisis.Joshua B. Grubbs, A. Shanti James, Brandon Warmke & Justin Tosi - 2022 - Journal of Research in Personality 97 (104187):1-10.
    The present study aimed to understand how status-oriented individual differences such as narcissistic antagonism, narcissistic extraversion, and moral grandstanding motivations may have longitudinally predicted both behavioral and social media responses during the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic. Via YouGov, a nationally representative sample of U.S. adults was recruited in August of 2019 (N = 2,519; Mage = 47.5, SD = 17.8; 51.4% women) and resampled in May of 2020, (N = 1,533). Results indicated that baseline levels of narcissistic antagonism (...)
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  37.  30
    Justin Mossay: La Mort et l'au-delà dans saint Grégoire de Nazianze. (Univ. de Louvain: Travaux d'Histoire et de Philologie, 4e sér., fasc. 34.) Pp. xv+375. Louvain: Publications Universitaires, Stiff paper. 550 B.fr. [REVIEW]H. Chadwick - 1970 - The Classical Review 20 (2):245-245.
  38.  68
    Putting Pragmatism to Work in the Cold War: Science, Technology, and Politics in the Writings of James B. Conant.Justin Biddle - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (4):552-561.
    This paper examines James Conant’s pragmatic theory of science – a theory that has been neglected by most commentators on the history of 20th-century philosophy of science – and it argues that this theory occupied an important place in Conant’s strategic thinking about the Cold War. Conant drew upon his wartime science policy work, the history of science, and Quine’s epistemological holism to argue that there is no strict distinction between science and technology, that there is no such thing as (...)
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  39.  21
    Dubious Decision Evidence and Criterion Flexibility in Recognition Memory.Justin Kantner, Jean M. Vettel & Michael B. Miller - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  40.  3
    Justin, Philosopher and Martyr: Apologies by Denis Minns and Paul Parvis.Alastair H. B. Logan - 2010 - New Blackfriars 91 (1035):611-612.
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  41.  12
    A Robot Hand Testbed Designed for Enhancing Embodiment and Functional Neurorehabilitation of Body Schema in Subjects with Upper Limb Impairment or Loss.Randall B. Hellman, Eric Chang, Justin Tanner, Stephen I. Helms Tillery & Veronica J. Santos - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  42.  13
    Educating for an Inclusive Economy: Cultivating Relationality Through International Immersion.Abigail B. Schneider & Daniel P. Justin - 2020 - Humanistic Management Journal 5 (1):133-151.
    As the gap between the world’s rich and poor grows wider and the limitations of institutional solutions such as foreign aid continue to be exposed, students of development are shifting their focus toward individualistic business-based solutions that seek to draw members of marginalized communities into the global marketplace. This focus on the individual, however, raises three interconnected issues: it privileges a view of the human person as individualistic versus relational, it proposes isolated solutions that are not scalable, and it can (...)
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  43. BCI-FES With Multimodal Feedback for Motor Recovery Poststroke.Alexander B. Remsik, Peter L. E. van Kan, Shawna Gloe, Klevest Gjini, Leroy Williams, Veena Nair, Kristin Caldera, Justin C. Williams & Vivek Prabhakaran - 2022 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 16.
    An increasing number of research teams are investigating the efficacy of brain-computer interface -mediated interventions for promoting motor recovery following stroke. A growing body of evidence suggests that of the various BCI designs, most effective are those that deliver functional electrical stimulation of upper extremity muscles contingent on movement intent. More specifically, BCI-FES interventions utilize algorithms that isolate motor signals—user-generated intent-to-move neural activity recorded from cerebral cortical motor areas—to drive electrical stimulation of individual muscles or muscle synergies. BCI-FES interventions aim (...)
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  44.  3
    The Implementation Chasm Hindering Genome-Informed Health Care.Kevin B. Johnson, Ellen Wright Clayton, Justin Starren & Josh Peterson - 2020 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 48 (1):119-125.
    The promises of precision medicine are often heralded in the medical and lay literature, but routine integration of genomics in clinical practice is still limited. While the “last mile” infrastructure to bring genomics to the bedside has been demonstrated in some healthcare settings, a number of challenges remain — both in the receptivity of today's health system and in its technical and educational readiness to respond to this evolution in care. To improve the impact of genomics on health and disease (...)
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  45.  97
    Implicit Theories of Intellectual Virtues and Vices: A Focus on Intellectual Humility.Peter L. Samuelson, Matthew J. Jarvinen, Thomas B. Paulus, Ian M. Church, Sam A. Hardy & Justin L. Barrett - 2014 - Journal of Positive Psychology 5 (10):389-406.
    The study of intellectual humility is still in its early stages and issues of definition and measurement are only now being explored. To inform and guide the process of defining and measuring this important intellectual virtue, we conducted a series of studies into the implicit theory – or ‘folk’ understanding – of an intellectually humble person, a wise person, and an intellectually arrogant person. In Study 1, 350 adults used a free-listing procedure to generate a list of descriptors, one for (...)
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  46.  16
    Decision Technologies in Medical Research and Practice: Practical Considerations, Ethical Implications, and the Need for Dialectic Evaluation.P. Justin Rossi, Philipp Novotny, Peyton Paulick, Herbert Plischke, Nikola B. Kohls & James Giordano - 2013 - Ethics in Biology, Engineering and Medicine 4 (2):91-102.
  47.  1
    Body Image Concerns in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer: A Longitudinal Study.Melissa Henry, Justine G. Albert, Saul Frenkiel, Michael Hier, Anthony Zeitouni, Karen Kost, Alex Mlynarek, Martin Black, Christina MacDonald, Keith Richardson, Marco Mascarella, Gregoire B. Morand, Gabrielle Chartier, Nader Sadeghi, Christopher Lo & Zeev Rosberger - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    ObjectiveHead and neck cancer treatments are known to significantly affect functionality and appearance, leading to an increased risk for body image disturbances. Yet, few longitudinal studies exist to examine body image in these patients. Based on a conceptual model, the current study aimed to determine, in patients newly diagnosed with HNC: the prevalence, level, and course of body image concerns; correlates of upon cancer diagnosis body image concerns; predictors of immediate post-treatment body image concerns; and association between body image concerns (...)
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  48.  28
    C. Riedweg: Ps.-Justin (Markell von Ankyra?), Ad Graecos de vera reliogine (bisher 'Cohortatio ad Graecos'). (Schweizerische Beitrage zur Altertumswissenschaft, 25) 2 vols. Basel: Friedreich Reinhardt Verlag, 1994. [REVIEW]M. B. Trapp - 1996 - The Classical Review 46 (1):15-16.
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  49.  13
    Seven Sins in the Study of Unconscious Affect.Gerald L. Clore, Justin Storbeck, Michael D. Robinson & David B. Centerbar - 2005 - In Lisa Feldman Barrett, Paula M. Niedenthal & Piotr Winkielman (eds.), Emotion and Consciousness. Guilford Press. pp. 384-408.
  50.  89
    Contrastivism About Reasons and Ought.Justin Snedegar - 2015 - Philosophy Compass 10 (6):379-388.
    Contrastivism about some concept says that the concept is relativized to sets of alternatives. Relative to some alternatives, the concept may apply, but relative to others, it may not. This article explores contrastivism about the central normative concepts of reasons and ought. Contrastivism about reasons says that a consideration may be a reason for an action A rather than one alternative, B, but may not be a reason for A rather than some other alternative, C. Likewise, contrastivism about ought says (...)
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