Results for 'Sedat Yazici'

264 found
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  1.  3
    Unity with(in) Plurality: Rawls’s Idea of Public Justification Reinterpreted.Sedat Yazici - 2004 - South African Journal of Philosophy 23 (2):120-133.
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  2. Part VI palliative sedation.Palliative Sedation - 2002 - In Chris Gastmans (ed.), Between Technology and Humanity: The Impact of Technology on Health Care Ethics. Leuven University Press. pp. 217.
     
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  3.  2
    Continuous Sedation at the End of Life: Ethical, Clinical and Legal Perspectives.Sigrid Sterckx, Kasper Raus & Freddy Mortier (eds.) - 2013 - Cambridge University Press.
    Continuous sedation until death is an increasingly common practice in end-of-life care. However, it raises numerous medical, ethical, emotional and legal concerns, such as the reducing or removing of consciousness, the withholding of artificial nutrition and hydration, the proportionality of the sedation to the symptoms, its adequacy in actually relieving symptoms rather than simply giving onlookers the impression that the patient is undergoing a painless 'natural' death, and the perception that it may be functionally equivalent to euthanasia. This book brings (...)
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  4.  51
    Continuous sedation until death: moral justifications of physicians and nurses—a content analysis of opinion pieces. [REVIEW]Sam Rys, Freddy Mortier, Luc Deliens, Reginald Deschepper, Margaret Pabst Battin & Johan Bilsen - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (3):533-542.
    Continuous sedation until death (CSD), the act of reducing or removing the consciousness of an incurably ill patient until death, often provokes medical-ethical discussions in the opinion sections of medical and nursing journals. A content analysis of opinion pieces in medical and nursing literature was conducted to examine how clinicians define and describe CSD, and how they justify this practice morally. Most publications were written by physicians and published in palliative or general medicine journals. Terminal Sedation and Palliative Sedation are (...)
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  5.  63
    Palliative sedation, foregoing life-sustaining treatment, and aid-in-dying: what is the difference?Patrick Daly - 2015 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 36 (3):197-213.
    After a review of terminology, I identify—in addition to Margaret Battin’s list of five primary arguments for and against aid-in-dying—the argument from functional equivalence as another primary argument. I introduce a novel way to approach this argument based on Bernard Lonergan’s generalized empirical method. Then I proceed on the basis of GEM to distinguish palliative sedation, palliative sedation to unconsciousness when prognosis is less than two weeks, and foregoing life-sustaining treatment from aid-in-dying. I conclude that aid-in-dying must be justified on (...)
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  6. Sedation, Suicide, and the Limits of Ethics.James A. Dunson - 2017 - Lexington Books.
    In this book, James Dunson explores end-of-life ethics including physician-assisted suicide and continuous sedation. He argues that ethical debates currently ignore the experience of the dying patient in an effort to focus on policy creation, and proposes that the dying experience should instead be prioritized and used to inform policy development.
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  7. Sedation at the End-of-life: An Interdisciplinary Approach.Paulina Taboada (ed.) - 2015 - Dordrecht: Imprint: Springer.
    The book's main contribution is its interdisciplinary approach to the issue of sedation at the end-of-life. Because it occurs at the end of life, palliative sedation raises a number of important ethical and legal questions, including whether it is a covert form of euthanasia and for what purposes it may legally be used. Many of the book chapters address the first question and almost all deal with a specific form of the second: whether palliative sedation should be used for those (...)
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  8. Palliative sedation.J. Andrew Billings - 2014 - In Timothy E. Quill & Franklin G. Miller (eds.), Palliative care and ethics. Oxford University Press.
     
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  9.  23
    Sedation in the management of refractory symptoms: guidelines for evaluation and treatment.Nathan I. Cherny & Russell K. Portenoy - forthcoming - Journal of Palliative Care.
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  10.  51
    Terminal sedation and the "imminence condition".V. Cellarius - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (2):69-72.
    “Terminal sedation” refers to the use of sedation as palliation in dying patients with a terminal diagnosis. Although terminal sedation has received widespread legal and ethical justification, the practice remains ethically contentious, particularly as some hold that it foreseeably hastens death. It has been proposed that empirical studies show that terminal sedation does not hasten death, or that even if it may hasten death it does not do so in a foreseeable way. Nonetheless, it is clear that providing terminal sedation (...)
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  11.  33
    Terminal sedation: source of a restless ethical debate.J. J. M. van Delden - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (4):187.
    Slow euthanasia or a good palliative intervention?There are many ways in which doctors influence the circumstances and/or the timing of a patient’s death. Some of these are accepted as normal medical practice—for instance, when a disproportional treatment is forgone, others are considered tolerable only under strict conditions or even intolerable, such as non-voluntary active euthanasia. A relatively new phenomenon in the ethical discussion on end-of-life decisions is terminal sedation. Terminal sedation is used in patients with terminal illnesses where normal medical (...)
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  12.  3
    A Structuralist Approach To Elçin’s Posta Şubesinde Hayal.Adigüzel Sedat - 2011 - Journal of Turkish Studies 6:293-303.
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  13. Continuous Sedation Until Death as Physician-Assisted Suicide/Euthanasia: A Conceptual Analysis.S. H. Lipuma - 2013 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 38 (2):190-204.
    A distinction is commonly drawn between continuous sedation until death and physician-assisted suicide/euthanasia. Only the latter is found to involve killing, whereas the former eludes such characterization. I argue that continuous sedation until death is equivalent to physician-assisted suicide/euthanasia in that both involve killing. This is established by first defining and clarifying palliative sedation therapies in general and continuous sedation until death in particular. A case study analysis and a look at current practices are provided. This is followed by a (...)
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  14. Palliative sedation: ethical aspects.Bert Broeckaert - 2002 - In Chris Gastmans (ed.), Between Technology and Humanity: The Impact of Technology on Health Care Ethics. Leuven University Press. pp. 239--255.
     
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  15. Palliative sedation: clinical aspects.J. Porta - 2002 - In Chris Gastmans (ed.), Between Technology and Humanity: The Impact of Technology on Health Care Ethics. Leuven University Press. pp. 219--237.
  16.  29
    Palliative sedation: not just normal medical practice. Ethical reflections on the Royal Dutch Medical Association's guideline on palliative sedation.Rien Janssens, Johannes J. M. van Delden & Guy A. M. Widdershoven - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (11):664-668.
    The main premise of the Royal Dutch Medical Association's (RDMA) guideline on palliative sedation is that palliative sedation, contrary to euthanasia, is normal medical practice. Although we do not deny the ethical distinctions between euthanasia and palliative sedation, we will critically analyse the guideline's argumentation strategy with which euthanasia is demarcated from palliative sedation. First, we will analyse the guideline's main premise, which entails that palliative sedation is normal medical treatment. After this, we will critically discuss three crucial propositions of (...)
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  17.  13
    Sedation before ventilator withdrawal.Barbara S. Edwards & Winston M. Ueno - 1991 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 2 (2):118.
  18.  15
    Palliative sedation: clinical context and ethical questions.Farr Curlin - 2018 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 39 (3):197-209.
    Practitioners of palliative medicine frequently encounter patients suffering distress caused by uncontrolled pain or other symptoms. To relieve such distress, palliative medicine clinicians often use measures that result in sedation of the patient. Often such sedation is experienced as a loss by patients and their family members, but sometimes such sedation is sought as the desired outcome. Peace is wanted. Comfort is needed. Sedation appears to bring both. Yet to be sedated is to be cut off existentially from human experience, (...)
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  19.  11
    Palliative sedation within the duty of palliative care within the Singaporean clinical context.Lalit Krishna & Jacqueline Chin - 2011 - Asian Bioethics Review 3 (3):207-215.
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  20.  7
    Sedating women with mental retardation for routine gynecologic examination: an ethical analysis.D. Brown, D. Rosen & T. E. Elkins - 1992 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 3 (1):68.
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  21.  19
    Sedation Until Death: Are the Requirements Laid Down in the Guidelines Too Restrictive?Govert den Hartogh - 2016 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 26 (4):369-397.
    In a substantial number of cases, dying patients are brought into a state of lowered consciousness and kept in it until they die in order to prevent or stop severe suffering. Many guidelines and position statements have been published in recent years on sedation until death, as I will call this policy. Some have been published by professional organisations and are meant to be binding for their members, others are the work of task forces and merely aim at providing medical, (...)
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  22.  18
    "Sedation before ventilator withdrawal: can it be justified by double effect and called" allowing a patient to die".R. J. Devettere - 1991 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 2 (2):122.
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  23.  16
    Do sedation and analgesia improve patientss satisfaction.Roland Pulanić - forthcoming - Ethics.
  24.  22
    Sedation and care at the end of life.Daniel Sulmasy - 2018 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 39 (3):171-180.
    This special issue of Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics takes up the question of palliative sedation as a source of potential concern or controversy among Christian clinicians and thinkers. Christianity affirms a duty to relieve unnecessary suffering yet also proscribes euthanasia. Accordingly, the question arises as to whether it is ever morally permissible to render dying patients unconscious in order to relieve their suffering. If so, under what conditions? Is this practice genuinely morally distinguishable from euthanasia? Can one ever aim directly (...)
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  25.  90
    Palliative sedation until death: an approach from Kant’s ethics of virtue.Jeroen G. J. Hasselaar - 2008 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 29 (6):387-396.
    This paper is concerned with the moral justification for palliative sedation until death. Palliative sedation involves the intentional lowering of consciousness for the relief of untreatable symptoms. The paper focuses on the moral problems surrounding the intentional lowering of consciousness until death itself, rather than possible adjacent life-shortening effects. Starting from a Kantian perspective on virtue, it is shown that continuous deep sedation until death (CDS) does not conflict with the perfect duty of moral self-preservation because CDS does not destroy (...)
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  26.  63
    Terminal Sedation as Palliative Care: Revalidating a Right to a Good Death.George P. Smith - 1998 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7 (4):382-387.
    Not everyone finds a in suffering. Indeed, even those who do subscribe to this interpretation recognize the responsibility of each individual to show not only sensitivity and compassion but render assistance to those in distress. Pharmacologic hypnosis, morphine intoxication, and terminal sedation provide their own type of medical to the terminally ill patient suffering unremitting pain. More and more states are enacting legislation that recognizes this need of the dying to receive relief through regulated administration of controlled substances. Wider legislative (...)
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  27.  3
    Palliative sedation in terminally ill patients.Paul C. Rousseau - 2004 - In C. Machado & D. E. Shewmon (eds.), Brain Death and Disorders of Consciousness. Plenum. pp. 263--267.
  28.  3
    Sedation in the terminally ill—A clinical perspective.Margaret O’Connor, David W. Kissane & Odette Spruyt - 1999 - Monash Bioethics Review 18 (3):17-27.
    This article discusses the place of sedation in the care of the terminally ill, as used in the practice of palliative care using case studies, clinical pragmatism forms the theoretical framework from which to elucidate the varying part that sedation plays in the overall management of a person facing the end of life. We contend that when used appropriately, sedation is an ethical and legitimate intervention that enhances comfort at the end of life and ought not sedate the person onto (...)
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  29.  14
    Sedation, Communication and Compromise: A British Perspective.Richard Huxtable - 2011 - Asian Bioethics Review 3 (2):131-136.
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  30.  85
    ‘Early terminal sedation’ is a distinct entity.Victor Cellarius - 2011 - Bioethics 25 (1):46-54.
    ABSTRACTThere has been much discussion regarding the acceptable use of sedation for palliation. A particularly contentious practice concerns deep, continuous sedation given to patients who are not imminently dying and given without provision of hydration or nutrition, with the end result that death is hastened. This has been called ‘early terminal sedation’. Early terminal sedation is a practice composed of two legally and ethically accepted treatment options. Under certain conditions, patients have the right to reject hydration and nutrition, even if (...)
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  31.  23
    Continuous sedation until death: the everyday moral reasoning of physicians, nurses and family caregivers in the UK, The Netherlands and Belgium.Kasper Raus, Jayne Brown, Clive Seale, Judith Ac Rietjens, Rien Janssens, Sophie Bruinsma, Freddy Mortier, Sheila Payne & Sigrid Sterckx - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):14.
    Continuous sedation is increasingly used as a way to relieve symptoms at the end of life. Current research indicates that some physicians, nurses, and relatives involved in this practice experience emotional and/or moral distress. This study aims to provide insight into what may influence how professional and/or family carers cope with such distress.
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  32.  23
    Sedation of Patients in Intensive Care Medicine and Nursing: ethical issues.Per Nortvedt, Gunnvald Kvarstein & Ingvild Jønland - 2005 - Nursing Ethics 12 (5):522-536.
    This article focuses on the ethical aspects of medically-induced sedation and pain relief in intensive care medicine. The study results reported are part of a larger investigation of patients’ experiences of being sedated and receiving pain relief, and also families’ experiences of having a close relative under controlled sedation in an intensive care unit. The study is based on qualitative in-depth interviews with nine nurses and six doctors working in intensive care and surgical units in a major Norwegian hospital. The (...)
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  33.  8
    Sedation before ventilator withdrawal: medical and ethical considerations.R. D. Truog, J. H. Arnold & M. A. Rockoff - 1990 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 2 (2):127-129.
  34.  85
    Terminal sedation: an emotional decision in end-of-life care.Simon Noah Etkind - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (8):508-509.
    A patient with end-stage motor neurone disease was admitted for hospice care with worsening bulbar symptoms. Although he initially walked onto the ward he became very distressed and asked for sedation. After much discussion, this man was deeply sedated, and after some harrowing days, died. Was it right to provide terminal sedation? What should the threshold be for such treatment? How should our personal reservations affect how we approach the distressed patient in an end-of-life situation?
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  35.  15
    Controversies surrounding continuous deep sedation at the end of life: the parliamentary and societal debates in France.Kasper Raus, Kenneth Chambaere & Sigrid Sterckx - forthcoming - Most Recent Articles: Bmc Medical Ethics.
    Continuous deep sedation at the end of life is a practice that has been the topic of considerable ethical debate, for example surrounding its perceived similarity or dissimilarity with physician-assisted dying...
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  36.  90
    Terminal sedation: Pulling the sheet over our eyes.Margaret P. Battin - 2008 - Hastings Center Report 38 (5):pp. 27-30.
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  37.  40
    Can Al-Ghazali's Conception of Modality Propose a Solution to Rowe's Argument against Divine Freedom?Seyma Yazici - 2021 - Res Philosophica 98 (2):331-351.
    William L. Rowe poses a dilemma between God’s freedom and essential moral goodness by arguing that God cannot satisfy the arguably accepted condition for libertarian freedom, namely, ability to do otherwise. Accordingly, if God does a morally good action A freely, then there is at least a possible world in which God refrains from doing A and thereby does the morally wrong action. And if God does a morally wrong action in one of the possible worlds, he ceases to be (...)
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  38.  77
    Is Continuous Sedation at the End of Life an Ethically Preferable Alternative to Physician-Assisted Suicide?Kasper Raus, Sigrid Sterckx & Freddy Mortier - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (6):32 - 40.
    The relatively new practice of continuous sedation at the end of life (CS) is increasingly being debated in the clinical and ethical literature. This practice received much attention when a U.S. Supreme Court ruling noted that the availability of CS made legalization of physician-assisted suicide (PAS) unnecessary, as CS could alleviate even the most severe suffering. This view has been widely adopted. In this article, we perform an in-depth analysis of four versions of this ?argument of preferable alternative.? Our goal (...)
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  39.  36
    Palliative Sedation: It's Not a Panacea.Alexander A. Kon - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (6):41 - 42.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 6, Page 41-42, June 2011.
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  40. Palliative Sedation, Physician-Assisted Suicide, and Euthanasia: “Same, Same but Different”?Bert Broeckaert - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (6):62 - 64.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 6, Page 62-64, June 2011.
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  41.  36
    Active voluntary euthanasia, terminal sedation, and assisted suicide.Candace Cummins Gauthier - 2001 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 12 (1):43.
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  42.  28
    Terminal sedation: ethically problematic or justifiable?Reiner Anselm - 2004 - Ethik in der Medizin 16 (4):342-348.
    Terminale Sedierung ist unter bestimmten Umständen ethisch rechtfertigbar: Mit dem Wissen um die Begrenztheit des eigenen Lebens ist auch der Sterbeprozess ein bewusst zu gestaltender, dem eigenen Willen unterworfener Bestandteil des Lebens. Das schließt auch die (paradoxe) Möglichkeit ein, bewusst auf das Bewusstsein beim eigenen Sterben zu verzichten. Anhand eigener Studien kann der Autor zeigen, dass sich der Wunsch nach Sterbehilfe bei terminal kranken Menschen als die Folge einer konsequenten Einordnung in das System der Medizin deuten lässt. Infolgedessen begreifen Patienten (...)
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  43.  62
    Continuous deep sedation at the end of life and the 'natural death' hypothesis.Kasper Raus, Sigrid Sterckx & Freddy Mortier - 2012 - Bioethics 26 (6):329-336.
    Surveys in different countries (e.g. the UK, Belgium and The Netherlands) show a marked recent increase in the incidence of continuous deep sedation at the end of life (CDS). Several hypotheses can be formulated to explain the increasing performance of this practice. In this paper we focus on what we call the ‘natural death’ hypothesis, i.e. the hypothesis that acceptance of CDS has spread rapidly because death after CDS can be perceived as a ‘natural’ death by medical practitioners, patients' relatives (...)
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  44.  57
    İbn Sînâ’da İdrak Mertebeleri ve İkinci Felsefî Ma’kûller.Sedat Baran - 2020 - Tasavvur - Tekirdag Theology Journal 6 (1):291-312.
    İdrak ve niteliği felsefenin en önemli problemlerinden biridir. İbn Sînâ hissî, hayalî, vehmî ve aklî olmak üzere dört farklı idrak mertebesi dillendirir. Buna göre insan nefsi nesnelerin suretlerini duyu yetileriyle algılar. Daha sonra bu suretleri hayal yetisine teslim eder. Akabinde akıl bu sureti barındırdığı maddî eklentilerden arındırarak aklî suretlerin oluşumu için gerekli zeminleri hazırlar. Daha sonra faal akıl insan nefsine aklî suretleri verir. İnsan zihninde duyularla algılanan bu kavramlardan başka kavramlar da vardır. Bu küllî kavramların yeri nesnel âlem değil öznel (...)
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  45.  13
    Tuğba Çelik . Dil ve Edebiyat Öğretimi, Ankara: Anı Yayıncılık, 326 s. ISBN 978-605-4434-60-2.Sedat Karagül - 2012 - Journal of Turkish Studies 7:2829-2831.
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  46.  29
    Terminal sedation, euthanasia, and causal roles.Dieter Birnbacher - 2004 - Ethik in der Medizin 16 (4):358-368.
    ZusammenfassungWährend die terminale Sedierung neueren niederländischen Erhebungen zufolge bereits in mehr als 5% aller Sterbefälle zur Leidensminderung am Lebensende angewandt wird, sind viele der durch dieses Verfahren aufgeworfenen begrifflichen und ethischen Fragen weiterhin offen. Kontrovers ist insbesondere die begriffliche Einordnung der Kombination von terminaler Sedierung und Behandlungsabbruch sowie die Frage nach den dafür einschlägigen ethischen Kriterien. Ausgehend von einer Analyse von drei Szenarien mit unterschiedlicher kausaler Rollenverteilung argumentiere ich dafür, den Standardfall der Kombination von terminaler Sedierung und Behandlungsabbruch unter die (...)
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  47.  7
    Edebî Tür Ve Tarz Açısından Tevbe-N'meler Ve Lebîb Divanı'nda Yer Alan Tevbe-N'me Örneği Üzerine Değ.Sedat Kardaş - 2013 - Journal of Turkish Studies 8 (Volume 8 Issue 13):1175-1175.
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  48.  29
    Should sedation be terminal?Nancy Guilfoy Valko - 2002 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 2 (4):601-608.
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  49.  12
    The Thoughts of İsmayıl Hakkı Baltacıoğlu on Writing Education and “Yazının Usûl-i Tedrisi”.Sedat Maden - 2010 - Journal of Turkish Studies 6:1527-1542.
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  50.  46
    The Recent Turkish Crisis: Another Step Toward Free Market Authoritarianism.Sedat Aybar & Costas Lapavitsas - 2001 - Historical Materialism 8 (1):297-308.
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